Income earned from Formula One races in India are taxable, says Supreme Court

first_imgThe Supreme Court on Monday held that Formula One World Championship (FOWC) which conducts Formula One car racing events, has a permanent establishment (PE) for its business in India and income accruing from it is taxable.A permanent establishment (PE) is a fixed place of business which generally gives rise to income or value-added tax liability in a particular jurisdiction.”We have held that FOWC has PE in India and income that is attributable in India will be taxed. The amount that is to be taxed is to be assessed by an assessing officer,” a bench of Justices A K Sikri and Ashok Bhushan said.Advocate Ankur Saigal, who appeared for Jaypee Group, said that though the detailed judgement is awaited but the apex court has held that an assessing officer will assess the income to be taxed.Jaypee Group, in association with others, has organised Formula One car races in Greater Noida, adjacent to national capital in the past few years.The first edition of the championship took place on October 30, 2011. Jaypee Sports International Limited is the organiser of Formula One racing in India and has signed a five-year contract with Formula One Management (FOM) to host the championship in India.The event did not take place in 2014 and since then because of an ongoing tax dispute with the Uttar Pradesh government, the event has not been held.FOWC has challenged last year’s Delhi High Court judgement which had ruled that a payment by Jaiprakash Associates Ltd for the use of FOWC logos and symbols to promote the Grand Prix couldn’t be considered royalty and be taxed as such.advertisementThe high court had also ruled that FOWC has a permanent establishment in India for conducting its business and set aside the finding of the Authority of Advance Ruling (AAR) on the issue.It had said the use of trademarks was ‘purely incidental’ and as event organiser and host of the F1 Grand Prix Championship, Jaypee was bound to use the F1 marks, logos and devices.FOWC and Jaypee group had approached the AAR to ascertain if the payment received by FOWC outside India from Jaypee could be considered royalty or not in terms of the double taxation avoidance agreement between the UK and Indian governments.Another question for consideration before the AAR was whether FOWC had a permanent establishment for its business in India which it found that the payment was royalty and taxable and that Formula One did not have a permanent establishment in India.ALSO READ:Formula One: Malaysia confirms race to be halted from 2018 due to low returnsALSO READ:Formula One: Ferrari’s Italian stallion has a spring in its stepALSO READ:Formula 1: Vettel holds off late Hamilton charge, says “I love what I do”last_img read more

Cargill on the Hunt for New CO2 Reduction Technologies

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Cargill Swiss freight trader Cargill has launched the “CO2 Challenge” which aims to find and scale new technologies capable of reducing a ship’s gross CO2 emissions by ten percent.The initiative is in line with the company’s recently revealed CO2 per cargo-ton-mile reduction target of 15 percent by the end of 2020.Cargill’s partners in the project are DNV GL, which will be in charge of assessing the technologies proposed and modeling potential efficiency gains, and Rainmaking, a company which specializes in start-up accelerators.“The CO2 Challenge is the start of an exciting journey. By taking this innovative approach, we hope to uncover new technologies, new ideas and new ways of working to help our industry meet the challenge of decarbonization and reduce its impact on global warming. Applicants have a unique opportunity to see their product make it onto a vessel and, hopefully, into wider commercial production,” said Jan Dieleman, president of Cargill’s ocean transportation business.The challenge is open to all businesses and entrepreneurs who have a product in need of commercial assessment, testing, investment and scaling. The application deadline is September 17, 2018.The shipping industry is putting a greater focus on decarbonization in the wake of the IMO’s decision from April 2018 that the international shipping must at least halve its GHG emissions by 2050.“The IMO strategy for carbon reduction sets a clear target for shipping. Initiatives like the CO2 Challenge are an important part of helping our industry reach these ambitious but achievable goals,” says Trond Hodne, senior vice president, sales & marketing director at DNV GL – Maritime.“As an industry, we need to explore solutions like zero-carbon fuels, energy efficiency measures, efficient vessel designs, and better ship utilization backed by deep technical knowledge, solid data and analysis. ”Interested parties can apply here.last_img read more

SCHITTS CREEK LETTERKENNY LEAD CANADIAN COMEDY TAKEOVER IN US

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Some cast members of Schitt’s Creek, including Eugene Levy, centre, pose on the red carpet of Canadian Screen Awards gala honouring Creative Fiction Storytelling on March 27 in Toronto. (Sharon Wu/CBC) Advertisement As the Canadian Screen Awards week culminates with Sunday night’s broadcast gala, expect Canadian comedies to be front and centre. CBC’s hit comedy Schitt’s Creek, which just last week announced next season will be its last, has six nominations, while Crave TV’s Letterkenny has three.But the industry buzz both shows have recently received has less to do with their achievements in Canada and more to do with their success in the U.S. — something that’s eluded Canadian-made comedies for decades, even as Canadian comedians became household names. Schitt’s Creek, in particular, is enjoying a rare combination of commercial and popular success south of the border: from the glowing New York Times reviews to sold-out live shows by its cast members.“Schitt’s Creek has really broken through in a way that not a lot of even American-produced comedies have done lately,” says Alan Sepinwall, chief TV critic for Rolling Stone magazine.Schitt’s Creek’s journey Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Sitting in his office at Pop TV in Los Angeles, Brad Schwartz is beaming with pride and emotion as he recalls the day he decided his small cable channel should broadcast Schitt’s Creek to American audiences.Dan and Eugene Levy, the show’s creators and stars, already had CBC secured as the Canadian broadcaster. But Schwartz, a Canadian well established in the U.S. TV system, thought the little show with the funny title just might work there as well.“It’s a show that started with a wealthy family, a riches-to-rags story that in itself doesn’t seem like anything we haven’t seen before,” says Schwartz. “But the writing and the acting is so phenomenal, that the little things happen in the episode and the characters learn from those little things that happen, that change them in the next episode, and change them in the next episode.” Facebook Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more

Low and slow A tale of online recreational pot orders across Canada

first_imgCanadians were eager to buy legal cannabis for recreational use online on Oct. 17, as government-run and privately operated pot portals were lit up with thousands of orders within the first 24 hours of legalization day.However, the problems plaguing many of those initial orders such as delivery delays highlights the growing pains facing the newly legal market.The Canadian Press tried to order the cheapest available gram or pre-roll of dried flower in each province and territory during the afternoon of Oct. 17. One order could not be completed and two had still yet to arrive more than one week later.All websites required various age verification checks and most interfaces were easy to navigate, but the available product was low and delivery times were often slower than promised.The fastest delivery was in Halifax where the bureau received its order within two days, while it took a full week before the order arrived in Iqaluit. The cheapest order including delivery was in Quebec at roughly $14 and the most expensive was in the Northwest Territories at more than $31.Here’s how the pot order process rolled out across the country:NewfoundlandDelivery date: Still waitingShipping fee: $10 minimumCost: $8.99; $20.34 total costCannabis NL’s website was clean and easy to navigate, but on Oct. 17 the options for a quick, low-cost gram were limited. The “shop” section advertised dried flower, oils, pre-rolled joints and plants, but most products were labelled “coming soon.” The product page was fairly informative with a breakdown of the plant’s THC and CBD levels, growing method and province of origin, as well as acceptable methods of use. Sorting by lowest to highest price, the most affordable flower was a hybrid plant called Island Pink from Emerald Health Therapeutics Canada. The “expedited parcel” shipping was the cheaper option, promising a delivery time between five and seven days. On the morning of Oct. 26, the product had not yet arrived and Cannabis NL sent customers an email that said “unexpected challenges with supply” are causing “unfortunate delays.” It added that suppliers have agreed to begin refunding the Xpresspost shipping fees for orders that do not arrive within the posted delivery times.— Holly McKenzie-Sutter in St. John’s, N.L.———Prince Edward IslandDelivery date: Oct. 22Shipping fee: $7Cost: $7.83; $17.05 total cost including shippingThe P.E.I. Cannabis Corp. website greets you with a scenic Island landscape. The standard warnings flash “Start low. Go slow,” and various other catchy slogans. In product descriptions, some companies have opted to keep established illicit market names like “Diesel” while moved to establish their own names with strains like “Radiate”. The website allows users to sort by format, plant type, strength or brand, but not price. The package arrived Monday around 11:00 a.m. looking like anything else one would receive in the mail. FIGR’s No. 17 ground cannabis sealed in a red packet came with pamphlets about responsible smoking and a receipt. Though, the website advertised THC totals of 9.99 to 17.00 per cent and the description boasted levels of 21 per cent, the physical product was marked with a total THC percentage just under 13 per cent.— Tony Davis in Charlottetown———New BrunswickDelivery date: Oct. 22Shipping fee: $7Cost: $10.50; $17.50 total cost including shippingThe ordering process was simple. Just click on a button to state you are over 19, set up an account, order the product and go to the checkout to give your credit card info. A confirmation page after the order is placed indicated that the order should arrive by Friday. However, the package did not arrive at the office — part of the legislature press gallery in a secure government building — until Monday morning. Another reporter signed for the delivery, but was not asked for ID to ensure he was over 19 years of age. However, he’s close to 50 and bald. Inside the large plastic Canada Post envelope was a packing slip and the small brown paper envelope containing the cannabis. The envelope had a label with the product information and the perforation at the top of the envelope had a Cannabis NB seal over it.— Kevin Bissett in Fredericton———Nova ScotiaDelivery date: Oct. 19Shipping fee: $6.09Cost: $8.65; $16.95 total cost including shippingThe Halifax bureau attempted to order the least expensive brands of dried flower cannabis from the government operated Nova Scotia Liquor Corp. Cannabis site at 3 p.m. on legalization day, just hours after obtaining an identification number from a downtown store. The brands that ranged from $6.33 to just under $7.50 per gram were unavailable, according to the website’s search by price function. However, one gram of the Haven St. Mango Kush was available at $8.65. A Canada Post delivery agent arrived at the door of the office two days after the order and a colleague who hadn’t ordered the marijuana signed for it. The packaging included consumer information that suggested the user “start low and go slow” in using the marijuana, and noted the effects could last up to six hours.— Michael Tutton in Halifax———QuebecDelivery date: Oct. 22Shipping fee: $5Cost: $8.50; $14.25 total cost including shippingThe Montreal bureau ordered one gram of Harmoniser — an indica strain from Aphria Inc. at 3 p.m. on Oct. 17. When the package arrived the following Monday at 10:15 a.m., the Canada Post delivery person asked for an employee’s signature at the door. The package gave no hint of what it contained, except for the “18+ signature” printed above the barcode. The delivery person did not request ID to confirm age upon delivery — but the person accepting the package looked more than 25 years old.— Christopher Reynolds in Montreal———OntarioDelivery date: Still waitingShipping fee: $5.65Cost: $10.40, $16.05 total cost including shippingWith no brick-and-mortar cannabis stores in Ontario until next spring at the earliest, Ontarians can only buy legal recreational pot online. Unlike some other provincial retail websites, the designers of the Ontario Cannabis Store seem to have strived for austerity. Devoid of colour, there are no stock photos, only an OCS logo and a message warning off those below the age of 19. Once inside, it’s all business. The user is sent straight to the product range, represented by photos of the packaging, making it unclear in some instances what exactly is on offer. After choosing one gram of Tangerine Dream from brand San Rafael for $10.40, the checkout process was quick and efficient. A shipping charge of $5.65 was added, bringing the total to $16.05, far above the black market price of less than $10 per gram. OCS said the product should arrive within one to three days, but the order has yet to arrive more than one week later.— Jody White in Toronto———ManitobaDelivery date: Oct. 22Shipping fee: $7.95Cost: $12, $21.59 total cost including shippingWinnipeg’s Delta 9 Cannabis Store website is easy to navigate and advertises same-day delivery in the city, but the shelves of the online store were nearly empty. Of the 11 dried cannabis strains, eight were sold out. Most of the strains left were only sold in larger quantities (five grams for $60 or 10 grams for $120) and only one offered smaller quantities (DNA Genetics Lemon Skunk for $12 a gram). There were also smoking tools and accessories for sale including papers, lighters, vaporizers and cannabis cook books. Despite the website saying American Express was an accepted payment, after an hour in an online help chat and on the phone with employees and the bank, the only suggestion was use a different card. It took five days of waiting for it to show. It arrived in an unnecessarily large plastic container in a giant bubble-wrap envelope. It looked large for a gram but, much like a Prairie tumbleweed, it was not dense and extremely dry.— Kelly Geraldine Malone in Winnipeg———SaskatchewanDelivery date: Online orders were not available on Oct. 17Those looking to buy cannabis online from Jimmy’s Cannabis were out of luck on legalization day. A message on its website on Oct. 17 said it held back on online sales due to discussions between Health Canada and Canada Post, Jimmy’s shipping provider. Upon accessing its website, the user was asked to put in their date of birth. The website itself was both clean and trendy with a video playing above a header that said “Welcome to Jimmy’s.” There were five options at the top including flower, oil, accessories, apparel and a drop down with contact information, locations, about the company and the online shop. Upon clicking the online shop option, there were flowers, oil, pre-roll and accessories. However, on Oct. 22, Jimmy’s said in a post on its website that it was unable to open its e-commerce store “due to inventory shortages.” On Oct. 26, online cannabis sales were still unavailable.— Ryan McKenna in Regina———AlbertaDelivery date: Oct. 19Shipping fee: $9.95Cost: $9.24 before tax, $20.15 total cost including shippingAfter a few simple questions to verify age — Alberta’s site checks submitted answers against provincial databases — users are taken to the product page. Only plain white packages are shown. Each product entry provides THC content and whether it’s a sativa, indica or a hybrid. Strawberry Ice, $9.24 a gram, is described as “fun and fruity,” and “perfect for making the most of a sunny summer day.” The site won’t allow you to ship to a different address than the one provided for age verification. On Wednesday, the site offered 73 different types of dried flower from 24 different growers. By mid-afternoon, six were out of stock. It had four kinds of pre-rolled joints, two of which were gone by 3 p.m. Its only oil offering was also gone. The site was clean and classy, with lots of Alberta scenery and no psychedelia. You could be buying tires. The most expensive per-gram offering cost $14.95. The cannabis arrived Friday afternoon, two days after it was ordered, and picture identification with a current address was required.— Bob Weber in Edmonton———NunavutDelivery date: Oct. 24Shipping fee: roughly $9Cost: $16.99; $27.29 total cost including shippingAs an online customer in Nunavut, you become accustomed to a lack of options, all of which are expensive, and a sense of relief for even just getting an online order through. Internet speeds and access are far below national averages. Pot is no different. The government’s website says you can only buy from the approved vendor list, which contains one entry: Canopy Growth Corp., whose brand name is Tweed. To verify your age, you enter your date of birth and confirm you are not ordering from a shared device. Tweed offered four options — only dried flowers — in various quantities: one indica, two sativa and one hybrid. All but two options were sold out. With shipping, one gram of Lemon Skunk came to $27.29. Seven days later, postal workers deposited a package slip into a P.O. Box. It’s a short ATV ride to the postal warehouse. There, a worker said half the warehouse is full of pot orders.— Thomas Rohner in Iqaluit———Northwest TerritoriesDelivery date: Still waitingShipping fee: $12.47Cost: $17.50; $31.47 total cost including shippingThe Northwest Territories’ cannabis website was simple and easily navigated, though creating an account took 15 minutes longer than anticipated as a verification email took time to arrive. There were only seven items available, offering five strains in various sizes. Despite the territory’s pledge that cannabis prices would start at around $8.50 per gram, the cheapest one-gram package available online on legalization day cost $31.47. The total price included $17.50 for a gram of the Rockstar strain (one of two strains available in one-gram packages, identically priced), $1.50 in tax, and $12.47 in shipping to Yellowknife. The territory’s website stated proof of age would be required upon delivery. The package was shipped on Oct. 24 according to an email from the NWT website — well within standard time for anything to arrive. By the morning of Oct. 26, the package had not yet been delivered.— Ollie Williams with Cabin Radio in Yellowknife———YukonDelivery date: Oct. 23Shipping fee: $12 expedited shippingCost: $15.94; $29.34 total cost including shipping.The Cannabis Yukon website has an age verification process and a question about whether you are intoxicated. The scheduled website launch on Oct. 17 at 11 a.m. ran into a technical glitch, and didn’t go live until just before 12:30 p.m. At 3 p.m., it took a few tries through a couple of different computers before being able to access the site. The website showed pictures of happy people in various settings such as around a kitchen table or a campfire with direct links to various cannabis types. The website offers value, core and premium pricing, ranging from just over $10 to $155. The cheapest pre-rolled cannabis was $15.94. The only choice was expedited shipping, costing $12 — almost as much as the joint itself. The package didn’t arrive until Tuesday about 11 a.m. and delivery required identification and a signature, even though they did get my name wrong.— Tim Kucharuk with CKRW in Whitehorse———British ColumbiaDelivery date: Oct. 26Shipping fee: $10Cost: $8.99 before tax. $21.27 total cost including shippingIt took less than 15 minutes to complete an online order for one gram of marijuana at B.C. Cannabis Stores. To enter the B.C. cannabis website, users must confirm they are 19 years or older by providing their date of birth. There were about eight cannabis product for sale on legalization day in prices ranging from $6.99 per gram to $11.99 per gram. The cheapest brands of cannabis at $6.99 were already sold out just hours after the online store went live. Tangerine Dream at $8.99 a gram was still available. The total price, including a $10 shipping charge, taxes and the one gram of cannabis, was $21.27. On Oct. 20, the B.C. Liquor Distribution branch said it was “working hard to ship every order as quickly as possible” but “slight delays” meant rather than the estimated delivery period of up to two business days, the order would be shipped from the warehouse on Oct. 22. The order was picked up at a neighbourhood Canada Post outlet on the morning of Oct. 26. Packaged in a small, blue cardboard box, it included details about the strain, the THC and CBD content and a warning label, “Cannabis smoke is harmful.”— Dirk Meissner in Victorialast_img read more

Hotel workers remain on strike after latest offer rejected

first_imgHONOLULU — Hawaii hotel workers are expected to remain on strike this week after negotiations between the union and Kyo-ya Hotels and Resorts failed to result in a deal.The Unite Here Local 5 union and Kyo-ya are scheduled to return to talks next week.About 2,700 Marriott employees on Oahu and Maui went on strike early last month, seeking higher wages and better benefits.“We are extremely disappointed that Local 5 leadership rejected our latest offer which would have been the largest increase in compensation for any of the striking markets nationwide,” Kyo-ya said in the statement.Kyo-ya said its offer would have given employees an increase in combined wages and a workload reduction for housekeepers. Benefits for all active employees and retirees would not have changed.“Instead of accepting what would have been a fair and generous agreement, Local 5 leadership has elected to keep our employees out of work,” Kyo-ya said.The union said in a statement that the offer was not enough, but it is hopeful a “true settlement” will be made next week.“A true settlement offer is one that looks at the true cost of living and working in Hawaii and brings us toward the goal of all workers: ‘One Job Should Be Enough,’” the union said.Workers need to be paid enough so they only need one job in order support themselves, the union said.Kyo-ya Hotels and Resorts owns the Marriott-managed Moana Surfrider, The Royal Hawaiian, Sheraton Waikiki, Sheraton Princess Kaiulani, and Sheraton Maui Resort and Spa.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Taylor Bridge repair work to start this week following damage to north

first_imgAt this time, the Ministry says it is not clear as to what damaged the bridge.Permanent repairs to the damaged concrete are expected to begin this week, with work planned for off-peak hours, weather dependent.Until these repairs are complete, there is a 30 km/hr speed limit for traffic crossing the bridge.Drivers are encouraged to check DriveBC.ca for updates prior to travel. TAYLOR, B.C. – Repair work on the Taylor Bridge is expected to start this week.According to the B.C. Ministry of Transportation, the north end abutment of the Taylor Bridge was damaged the morning of September 3.The Ministry says the maintenance contractor noticed the damage as part of their regular patrols and quickly made temporary repairs.last_img

Woman caught during theft dies after locals beat her up

first_imgNew Delhi: A woman on Wednesday died under mysterious circumstances after Delhi Police claimed that she and her associate were beaten up by local labourers, whoapparently caught them stealing items from a pressure-cooker manufacturing unit in Outer North’s Samaypur Badli region. Police claimed that a group of seven to eight women entered the manufacturing unit on Wednesday night and while stealing items from the site, local labourers caught them red-handed. According to the police, two of the women were beaten by the labourers and locals alike, while the others fled. When police reached the spot, they broke up the scuffle and took both women to a nearby hospital in Rohini, where they were treated and discharged, said investigating officials. Police claimed that both women were arrested from the hospital and produced before the magistrate. After their judicial custody was ordered, one of the women, aged 37 years complained of pain and was taken to the hospital again, where she died. When asked whether the two women were subjected to police brutality of any form, DCP Gaurav Sharma said, “Deceased was caught red-handed while stealing and was beaten by public persons present around. She was not even made to visit police station and was arrested from hospital and presented before magistrate. No beating by police.”last_img read more

Notification for 3rd phase of LS polls in UP to be issued

first_imgLucknow: Notification for the third phase of Lok Sabha polls in Uttar Pradesh will be issued Thursday, an election official said here Wednesday. According to the Election Commission, the parliamentary constituencies going to polls in the third phase include Moradabad, Rampur, Sambhal, Firozabad, Mainpuri, Etah, Badaun, Aonla, Bareilly and Pilibhit. The last date for filing of nominations is April 4, while scrutiny of nominations will be held on April 5. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ The last date for withdrawal of candidature is April 8. Voting will be held on April 23 from 7.00 AM to 6.00 PM, while counting of votes will be done on May 23. The total number of voters, exercising their franchise in the third phase, is 1.76 crore. This includes 95.5 lakh male voters, 80.9 female voters and 983 third gender voters. Voting will be held at 12,128 polling centres in this phase. The number of voters in the 18-19 year bracket in the third phase are 2,98,619, while there are 2,99,871 voters in the above 80-year category.last_img read more

Carmelo Anthony Suffers Left Ankle Sprain in Win Over

New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony suffered a left ankle sprain Thursday night as he led his team to a 116-107 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers, leaving his status as unclear for Saturday’s game against the Cleveland Cavaliers.Anthony suffered the injury in the third quarter after driving to the basket and being fouled by Dwight Howard. The hard foul caused Anthony to hit the floor hard and land awkwardly on his left ankle, and his left leg folded back under his body as he hit the court.Anthony was able to get to his feet after the a few seconds and made his way to the free throw line. He made 1-of-2 free throws and was quickly subbed out at the next dead ball by Steve Novak.“It was a hard foul. I couldn’t catch my fall,” Anthony said after the game. “It was an awkward fall. Right now I’m sore.”He went on to add that his left ankle, knee and hip were extremely sore, but said it was too early to say to know if he would play against the Cavs on Saturday.Knicks coach Mike Woodson said after the game that Anthony would be day to day with a slight ankle sprain. Glen Grunwald, Knicks general manager said that he did not think the injury was severe.“I’ll wake up (on Friday) and see what happens,” Anthony said.Before Anthony left the game with 6:33 in the third quarter, he was having a stellar offensive performance that had fans in Madison Square Garden in an uproar.Anthony managed to make the Lakers defense look like a middle school team as he scored 22 points in the first quarter. He was only two points shy of the franchise record set by Willis Reed and Allan Houston.“I was zoned in. I was locked in. Tonight was one of those games where I had that feeling,” Anthony said.Anthony was so locked in that he finished with 30 points on 10-of-15 shooting in just 23 minutes of play when he left the game.This was the first reunion since the Olympics that Anthony had with Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni. D’Antoni was the Knicks coach last year before being fired and replaced by Woodson. There were reports that Anthony and D’Antoni clashed several times.But Anthony wanted to come into Thursday night not to seek revenge against his former coach, but to protect the Knicks’ perfect record at the Garden. They were 8-0 at home before entering the contest.Thursday’s night win pushed the Knicks home record to 9-0 and 17-5 on the season.If Anthony is unable to go on Saturday, this will be his third game that he has missed this season. He missed two earlier games this month against the Bulls and Heat with a cut to his middle left finger that needed five stitches.The Knicks went 1-1 without Anthony, beating the Heat by 20 points and losing to the Bulls. They hope to have Anthony against the Cavs, a team that beat the Lakers Tuesday night. read more