Many hands make light work of New Year’s bash

first_imgLifestyleEntertainmentNewsMany hands make light work of New Year’s bashBy Alan Jacques – December 5, 2013 826 ALMOST 2,000 people have been recruited and resourced in just eight weeks for Limerick City of Culture 2014’s New Year‘s Eve extravaganza.Details of the pageant  and City of Culture ‘NYE Sky’ have been unveiled with a promise of being “the most exciting and exuberant interactive family event” Limerick has ever seen.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The spectacular end-of-year bash promises to transport the streets of Limerick into a wonderful fairyland full of fantastical characters, glowing floats and magical music, with both skies and terra firma being brought to life.According to a press statement this week, the difficult task of creating this world-class show has been achieved in an “impossibly tight timeframe”. Involved in putting together this breathtaking project were: producer Joe Clarke, creative director Paul Boland, University Concert Hall, LITMT, Lime Tree Theatre, Murt Whelan Sound, Frontline Theatre School, Spotlight Stage School, Expressive Arts, Limerick Youth Theatre, Limerick Youth Choir, Cantet, Limerick City Hall, Peter Dee’s Academy of Music, Limerick Gospel Choir, Honest Arts, Music Generation, The Learning Hub, and many more on third level co-operative education placement.City of Culture chief executive Patricia Ryan is now predicting “the biggest and most magnificent occasion that Limerick has ever seen” on December 31.“The City will be illuminated like never before, breathing new life into every nook and cranny. It will be the celebration of all celebrations to kick off Limerick as the National City of Culture 2014,” she said.“The positives the City of Culture will bring to Limerick with this event alone are extremely substantial. It’s hugely encouraging to see 900 volunteers getting involved together with over 700 kids and teenagers across 20 Limerick schools working together to make this wonderful world class event happen,” she added.From 6:30pm on New Year’s Eve, a procession will be led by the multi-award winning street theatre company Bui Bolg through the fully pedestrianised streets of Limerick, along the banks of the River Shannon to the Medieval Quarter.Son et Lumiere, will turn the city and its night skies into a live storybook using cutting edge digital mapping and special lighting effects which will be projected onto Limerick’s historic buildings. Live narration and accompanying specially composed music will bring ‘The Story of the Boy who Looked for the Trout’, written by local playwright Mike Finn, to life.There is an open call for children and adults in Limerick to get involved in the City of Culture NYE. For more information contact www.cityofculturenye.ie. #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Get ready for the New Years Eve Firework display in Limerick City TAGSCity of CultureMusic LimerickNew Year’s Eve Watch the streamed gig for Fergal Nash album launch Print Linkedin Twitter Previous articleMunster favourites over FrenchNext articleEditorial – lend me your ear to fix the problem Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie center_img Email Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick Facebook Advertisement #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

New type of human stem cell may be more easy to manipulate

first_imgHarvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine (MGH-CRM) have a developed a new type of human pluripotent stem cell that can be manipulated more readily than currently available stem cells. As described in the latest edition of Cell Stem Cell, these new cells could be used to create better cellular models of disease processes and eventually may permit repair of disease-associated gene mutations.“It has been fairly easy to manipulate stem cells from mice, but this has not been the case for traditional human stem cells,” explains Niels Geijsen, PhD, of the MGH-CRM, who led the study.  “We had previously found that the growth factors in which mouse stem cells are derived define what those cells can do, and now we’ve applied those findings to human stem cells.”The first mammalian embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were derived from mice and have proven very useful for studying gene function and the impact of changes to individual genes. But techniques used in these studies to introduce a different version of a single gene or inactivate a particular gene were ineffective in human ESCs. In addition, human ESCs proliferate much more slowly than do cells derived from mice and grow in flat, two-dimensional colonies, while mouse ESCs form tight, three-dimensional colonies. It is been extremely difficult to propagate human ESCs from a single cell, which prevents the creation of genetically manipulated human embryonic stem cell lines.In previous work, Geijsen and his colleagues demonstrated that the growth factor conditions under which stem cells are maintained in culture play an important role in defining the cells’ functional properties. Since the growth factors appeared to make such a difference, the researchers tried to make a more useful human pluripotent cell using a new approach. They derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) – which are created by reprogramming adult cells and have many of the characteristics of human ECSs, including resistance to manipulation – in cultures containing the growth factor LIF, which is used in the creation of mouse ESCs.The resulting cells visibly resembled mouse ESCs and proved amenable to a standard gene manipulation technique that exchanges matching sequences of DNA, allowing the targeted deactivation or correction of a specific gene. The ability to manipulate these new cells depended on both the continued presence of LIF and expression of the five genes that are used in reprogramming adult cells into iPSCs. If any of those factors was removed, these hLR5- (for human LIF and five reprogramming factors) iPSCs reverted to standard iPSCs.“Genetic changes introduced into hLR5-iPSCs would be retained when they are converted back to iPSCs, which we then can use to generate cell lines for future research, drug development and someday stem-cell based gene-correction therapies,” says Geijsen. He is an assistant professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a principal faculty member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute.Co-authors of the Cell Stem Cell are lead author Christa Buecker, MGH-CRM and Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI); Hsu-Hsin Chen, PhD, Laurence Dahern, and Konrad Hochedlinger, PhD, MGH-CRM and HSCI; Patricia Okwieka, MGH-CRM; Jose Polo, PhD, MGH Cancer Center; Lei Bu, PhD, MGH Cardiovascular Research Center; Tahsin Stefan Barakat and Joost Gribnau, PhD, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; and Andrew Porter, PhD, Imperial College London, U.K. The study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Dutch Science Organization, the Gottlieb Daimler and Karl Benz Foundation and the National Science Council of Taiwan.last_img read more