Tennis star Venus Williams settles fatal crash lawsuit

first_imgNeymar picks up apparent groin injury during Brazil friendly Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown LATEST STORIES Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award FILE – In this Jan. 28, 2017, file photo, Venus Williams answers questions at a press conference following her loss to sister Serena in the women’s singles final at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia. Court records show that tennis star Venus Williams has settled a wrongful death lawsuit related to a fatal car crash in Florida. Palm Beach County court records show that the case was closed last week. Terms of the agreement between Williams and the estate of 78-year-old Jerome Barson weren’t included in the documents. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)WEST PALM BEACH, Florida — Tennis star Venus Williams has settled a wrongful death lawsuit related to a fatal car crash in Florida, court records show.Palm Beach County court records show that the case was closed Friday. Terms of the agreement between Williams and the estate of Jerome Barson, 78, weren’t included in the documents.ADVERTISEMENT Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Williams has career on-court earnings of about $40 million, her own clothing line and endorsement deals with Ralph Lauren, Kraft foods, Tide detergent and Wilson sporting goods. She also owns a small percentage of the Miami Dolphins.Attorneys for Williams and the Barsons didn’t immediately return messages seeking comment. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Palm Beach Gardens police previously cleared both Williams and Barson’s wife, Linda, in the June 9, 2017 crash that fatally injured Barson. A police report said an unidentified third vehicle illegally cut off Williams as she tried to cross a busy six-lane highway near her home, setting off a chain of events that ended with a sedan driven by Linda Barson, 68, slamming into the passenger side of Williams’ SUV.Jerome Barson died 13 days after the crash, and his wife suffered a broken arm and other injuries. Williams, 38, was not hurt.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissOfficer David Dowling, the lead investigator, said in his report that video from a nearby security camera shows Williams legally entered the intersection from a road exiting her gated neighborhood on a green light. As she started to cross, a dark sedan cut her off, forcing her to stop. When the sedan cleared her path, Williams began moving forward in her 2010 Toyota Sequoia, but that put her in the path of the Barsons, who now had the green light. The Barsons’ 2016 Hyundai Accent hit Williams’ SUV at 40 mph (65 kph).Dowling said in his report that state law required Williams to exit the intersection and that even though Linda Barson had the green light she was obligated to make sure the intersection was clear. MOST READ Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college View comments Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more

Winter bird tour to highlight environmental richness of threatened Donegal bay

first_imgBallyness Bay has been in the news recently on account of a major plan to convert this beautiful tidal estuary into a large-scale shellfish farming area.There has been a great deal of shock in the locality about proposals that would see vast ugly beds of shellfish dominate this stunning coastal location between Falcarragh, Gortahork and Magheraroarty.People generally believe that the bay should be retained as an amenity for the local community and visitors. They think that it is far more valuable as a natural asset contributing to the well-being of all those who use and enjoy this amazing landscape.They also conclude that it can contribute greater economic benefit to the community through the growth of sustainable employment built around diverse outdoor activities and eco-tourism.Bird watching is just one of the many strands that form part of these varied outdoor pursuits. It is something that draws visitors into the area from far afield with the opportunity of viewing a rich array of coastal birdlife in an unspoilt natural setting.Ballyness Bay is an ideal location in which to appreciate the wonderful selection of birds to be found on our shores at this time of year. Protected on its seaward side by extensive sand dunes, this relatively sheltered bay and its surroundings provide excellent habitat for a wide variety of resident bird species as well as many seasonal visitors.It is particularly good as a wintering ground for waders and waterfowl, and its shores have been designated as a Special Area of Conservation.A guided tour on Saturday the 16th of November will offer the chance for people to explore some of the stunning locations around this lovely tidal landscape and learn more about the abundance of birdlife it nurtures.Those who come along will learn to identify birds that have flown south from more northerly locations to overwinter here, alongside some of the hardy locals that stick around through the colder darker months.This event is weather dependent. It is hoped those who come along will have an opportunity to observe some of the wildfowl, though in nature nothing can be guaranteed with certainty. It will be led by a local ecologist who has worked on various research and conservation programmes throughout Donegal. Those who wish to join in should phone (074) 918 0994 or (086) 822 0404 to reserve a place.As one might expect for a coastal walk in Winter you will need to wear warm clothes and sturdy, waterproof footwear, and if you have them to bring a pair of binoculars or a portable telescope.The tour will begin at 10am and should take about three hours. It is organised by The Glasshouses (LAN Ctr.) Cill Ulta, Falcarragh, and supported by Donegal ETB.Winter bird tour to highlight environmental richness of threatened Donegal bay was last modified: November 5th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Power-hitting teenager Marco Luciano gives San Francisco Giants a reason to dream

first_imgPHOENIX — It isn’t the impressive, raw power that’s a sudden surprise at the Giants’ minor league complex in Scottsdale.It isn’t the remarkably quick bat speed, the strong, accurate throwing arm or the ability to handle advanced pitching, either.When the Giants signed Marco Luciano, a gifted shortstop prospect out of the Dominican Republic, they knew all about the tools that would give him a chance to become a major league star. They expected the power, the bat speed and the ability to handle …last_img

Evolution Goes Forward, Backward and Sideways

first_imgAccording to an article by Becky Ham on MSNBC, evolution can make things more complicated or less complicated.  She referred to iconic cartoons that show the progress of evolution from slime to couch potato.  “It’s just a joke, but the idea that life starts simple and gets more complex over time persists even in scientific circles.”  One counter example, though, is the origin of single celled life.  Archaea and bacteria may be stripped-down versions of eukaryotes.  This idea from David Penny (Massey U, NZ) suggests that eukaryotes appeared first.    Penny said, “We do think there is a tendency to look at evolution as progressive.  We prefer to think of evolution as backwards, sideways, and occasionally forward.”  Penny and his colleagues deny the popular hypothesis that eukaryotic cells emerged from the fusion of earlier, simpler life forms.  “Although the idea seems contrary to our cherished notion that evolution makes organisms more complex,” Becky Ham (no relation to Ken Ham, as far as we know) wrote, “Penny and colleagues say it’s possible.”  Well, then, it follows that in evolution, anything is possible.  Penny’s colleague Chuck Kurland [Lund U, Sweden] provided more examples of simplification that “illustrate the Darwinian view of evolution as a reversible process in the sense that ‘eyes can be acquired and eyes can be lost.’  Genome evolution is a two-way street,” he said.Visualize a hockey puck on a frictionless surface infinite in all directions, moving about in various ways.  The concepts of forward, backward and sideways lose all meaning.  The same is true in relativistic Darwinland, where an incoming asteroid can cause extinction but also a boom in emergent innovation (see Fox News).  In the overall scheme of things, does it matter which direction is forward or backward?    For decades, most Darwinists have taught as fact the myth that eukaryotes are a more complex product that emerged from the fusion of simpler, more primitive microbes.  Progressivism is built into such a notion.  Now, if eukaryotes just appeared suddenly, then became stripped down into the other two kingdoms of microbes, then Darwinian miracles of emergence allow for anything.  Why don’t we extend Penny’s theory and conclude that bacteria are stripped-down humans?  (Sorry; that didn’t come out right.  Some people on the beach, though, do resemble amoebas.)Exercise:  Read the following sentence aloud:The Story of EvolutionEvolution explains more complexity, and more simplicity.  It explains why flight arose in some birds, but was lost in others.  With evolution, organs and genomes can become more complicated, or more streamlined.  Eyes emerge through evolution, but eyes are also lost by evolution.  Evolution makes the cheetah fast but the sloth slow.  By evolution, dinosaurs grow to skyscraper size, and hummingbirds grow tiny.  With evolution, peacocks grow more flashy and crows more black, giraffes tall and flatworms flat.  Evolution explains predator and prey, loner and herder, light and dark, high and low, fast and slow, profligacy and stinginess, terrorism and altruism, religion and atheism, virtue and selfishness, psychosis and reason, extinction and fecundity, war and peace.  Evolution explains everything.Now substitute the meaningless word Gribbleflix for Evolution and read it again.  There you have it: the world’s most successful, all-encompassing theory.  Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of Gribbleflix.  Don’t let the anti-Gribbleflix people sneak their dogma into the schools.  Gribbleflix is science.  Gribbleflix is a FACT!(Visited 26 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Whale watching in South Africa

first_imgSouth Africa is one of the best destinations worldwide for watching marine wildlife, including whales, whether from land or from boats, with spectacular annual visits from southern right and humpback whales and enormous pods of dolphins year-round.At least 37 species of whales and dolphins can be found in the waters off South Africa, and is most famous for rare encounters with southern right whales and humpback whales. (Image: Wikipedia)Brand South Africa reporterEvery year, southern right whales migrate from their icy feeding grounds off Antarctica to warmer climates, reaching South Africa in June. The country’s coastal waters teem with the giant animals, mating, calving and rearing their young – and giving whale-watchers spectacular displays of raw power and elegant water acrobatics.Watch out for:Blowing – the sound the whale makes when expelling air through its blowhole, which is accompanied by a spout of condensed water vapour; this is the normal breathing pattern of the mammal.Breaching – the whale leaps out of the water and falls back in with a large splash; whales can breach three to eight times in succession and the behavior is believed to be a means of communication, exercise or possibly to scratch the parasites off that live on them.Lobtailing – the whale slaps its fluke or tail on the water, causing a loud sound; again, it is believed to be a means of communication.Spy hopping – the whale lifts its head and body vertically, as far as the flippers, above the surface, which allows it to see what is happening around it above water.When is the best time?The best time for watching the southern right whale in South African waters is from June to November along the Cape south coast, although some will already be as far north as KwaZulu-Natal. Peak calving season is July and August, but whales can be seen through September and October.The curious humpback whale can be seen between May to December, moving up along the coast from Hermanus to St Lucia in KwaZulu-Natal.The medium-sized Bryde’s whale can be spotted all year round, and while rare, orcas can also be seen.In terms of the Marine Living Resources Act of 1998, it is an offence to approach any whale closer than 300m without a permit, so if you book a whale- watching cruise, make sure the company has a permit before you get on board.Where are the best spots?South African whale-watching territory runs from Doringbaai, far up the Cape West Coast, around the Cape Peninsula and as far up the East Coast as St Lucia, near the Mozambique border. They can be viewed from cliffs and beaches, while boat operators offer trips out to sea for close encounters.The route includes several famous protected areas, such as Table Mountain National Park, Garden Route, Tsitsikamma National Park, Transkei National Park and iSimangaliso Wetland Park.At least 37 species of whales and dolphins are found in South Africa’s oceans, although they are most famous for encounters with southern right whales, humpback whales, and several coastal dolphin species. Keep an eye open for African penguins, Cape fur seals, black oystercatcher birds and a variety of other marine life.Western CapeThe southern right’s breeding ground is the sheltered bays of the Western Cape coast, with the majestic animals spending up to five months a year here. They pass their time playing, courting, and nursing their newborn calves, providing spectacular land-based viewing.On the Cape West Coast, excellent sightings of southern rights can be enjoyed all the way from Strandfontein to Lambert’s Bay, Elands Bay, St Helena, Saldanha and Ysterfontein, just north of Cape Town.Whales can also be seen all around the Cape Peninsula.In Cape Town itself, you can see them from the road along the False Bay coast, and they’re distinctly visible on the western seaboard if you get high enough on the scenic coastal Victoria Road.Further south, the town of Hermanus in Walker Bay on the Cape south coast offers possibly the best land-based whale-watching in the world. The animals can be clearly seen from a scenic cliff-top walk, and the town holds a whale-watching festival every September. The Whale Crier informs the townsfolk and visitors of whale sightings and where the whales have come into the old harbour to calve.For the more adventurous, there is also aerial whale watching.Follow the coast to Cape Agulhas, the southernmost tip of Africa where two mighty oceans meet. It is particularly rewarding, with great views of southern right cows and calves at play – up to 50 pairs at a time.Mossel Bay, Plettenberg Bay and the Garden RouteThe whale-watching season in Mossel Bay runs from June to November, when four species are seen. The southern right is the most commonly sighted, coming into the bay to calve, but look for humpback, Bryde’s and orcas as well.Either drive along the coast, where there are informative whale interpretation boards at view points, or take a boat based whale-watching trip, or hike the St Blaize trail. Schools of up to 500 dolphins add to the spectacle. The most common dolphins found all year are heaviside’s, common, dusky and bottlenose.Southern rights visit Plettenberg Bay, further east, on the Western Cape Garden Route, from about June to November. Migratory humpback whales can also be briefly seen from May and June and then, on their return trip, from about November to January.Bryde’s whales or orcas are occasionally seen, and bottlenose and humpback dolphins are in residence all year. A breeding colony of Cape fur seals completes Plettenberg Bays’ impressive array of marine mammals.It is in Plett that the dolphin and whale-watching industry is most organised, with trips in boats, kayaks and aircraft on offer. Viewing, distances and time spent with each animal are strictly monitored so that there is minimal interference.The Garden Route generally, from Stilbaai through Mossel Bay and on to George, Wilderness, Knysna and Tsitsikamma, is a magnificent stretch of coastline hosting southern rights in their season, humpbacks between May and December, Bryde’s whales all year round – and, occasionally, killer whales.Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-NatalFrom Cape St Francis to the rugged Eastern Cape Wild Coast are numerous vantage points to see humpbacks, Bryde’s, minke and killer whales and quite often southern rights, especially in Algoa Bay, while sperm and beaked whales approach close to shore off Port St Johns.Humpback whales, and sometimes southern rights, can be spotted almost daily off the KwaZulu-Natal coast, occasionally being spotted as far north as Cape Vidal. From mid-May to mid-September, the whales are moving north on their way to their breeding grounds off the Mozambique coast, and from September to December they return, heading for the nutrient-rich waters of Antarctica.There are boat-based tours, but for land-based viewing there is a whale-watching tower at Cape Vidal and Mpenjati. Throughout the year pods of bottlenose dolphins of 30 to 50 strong routinely patrol up and down the coast just beyond the breakers.Article updated December 2015Sources: Centre for Dolphin Studies, Hermanus Tourism, South African TourismWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

Free Anamorphic Template for After Effects

first_imgApply an anamorphic effect to your video footage with this free template for Adobe After Effects.What if you could give your project an anamorphic look without expense lenses or adaptors? That’s the goal behind VashiVisuals free After Effects plugin, VashiMorphic40. You can now recreate the unique anamorphic look (a look recently popularized by Wes Anderson – see below), entirely in post production.From the VashiVisuals site:The VashiMorphic40 After Effects project was designed so that every filmmaker, on any budget, can capture the aesthetics and visual style of the Anamorphic lens. The plugins used in this project are included in After Effects or are free to download. I focused on matching the curvature and look of the 40mm Panavision Primo Anamorphic lens.The project settings allow for realistic anamorphic lens curvature, without any resizing or blowing up of the footage (preserving image sharpness). Additionally, there’s built-in settings for obtaining an even more vintage or stylized look with customizable vignette and blurred corners. Many thanks to Vashi Nedomansky for creating and sharing this FREE After Effects plugin![maxbutton id=”3″]Wes Anderson screengrabs from VashiVisuals (click for larger view):last_img read more