Cooperation and clarity key on day one of ICE VOX 2019

first_img The first day’s panels at ICE VOX 2019 saw speakers talk up the need for cooperation between operators and regulators if the industry is to survive in the face of increasing regulatory pressure and worsening public opinion. Speakers also highlighted the importance of clarity on issues such as the Department of Justice’s reinterpretation of the Wire Act and what is expected of operators when it comes to player protection. Cooperation and clarity key on day one of ICE VOX 2019 The first day’s panels at ICE VOX 2019 saw speakers talk up the need for cooperation between operators and regulators if the industry is to survive in the face of increasing regulatory pressure and worsening public opinion.Panellists also highlighted the need for clarity on issues such as the Department of Justice’s reinterpretation of the Wire Act and what is expected of operators when it comes to player protection.The opening day saw industry big-hitters including William Hill chief executive Philip Bowcock and Sky Betting and Gaming executive chairman Richard Flint debate the issue of regulation, namely whether a self-regulatory approach would benefit the sector.Their fellow panellist, David Clifton of Clifton Davies Consultancy, said that social responsibility has become a major focus over the past two years. Flint agreed, and noted that practices UK licensees would have considered standard operating procedure five years ago would no long fly today.In Bowcock’s eyes, a gambling regulator’s core duty is to protect the consumer, rather than enforce the rules. This led to the panel largely agreeing that in the UK at least, there was a lack of clarity on how the regulator expects licensees to ensure customers can avoid gambling-related harm.GVC’s Martin Lycka argued that operators and regulators had to work together. “The regulators have to define the [licence] requirements, but they must do this in constant collaboration with the industry,” he explained. “This must start from when regulation is being debated, developed, and then enforced.”Fellow panellist Dion Croom of Habet Addiction Healthcare said that the collaboration should extend beyond closer links between operators and regulators, and should also bring in healthcare professionals. He said this would help give operators a better understanding of the markers of harm and the consequences of addiction.Pinnacle chief executive Paris Smith added that there was no need to totally reinvent how problem gambling is detected. She explained that the artificial intelligence and automated solutions already used for marketing at Pinnacle were now being repurposed as a way of identifying at-risk or addicted customers.Measure of the market With the panel dominated by three of the industry’s largest UK operators in William Hill, Sky Bet and GVC, it was no surprise that the session kept coming back to the market. At a time when the Gambling Commission has handed out more than £47m in fines since 2015, and the retail betting sector faces mass shop closures as a result of the decision to cut FOBT stakes to £2, this was perhaps unsurprising.Flint admitted that the UK industry had failed to engage on a political level, meaning that it had not succeeded in putting across a positive case for its existence. At the same time, he noted, gambling was becoming regulated in a similar way to financial services, forcing a change in the operating culture of licensees.Clifton suggested that the current Gambling Commission approach was “all stick, no carrot”. He said that the regulator could do more to highlight the positive impact of initiatives by operators to encourage others to make changes that could positively impact the industry’s image and social responsibility controls.However, later in the day during a session discussing whether operators deserved the GC’s fines and penalty packages, Silverfish CSR director Laura Da Silva suggested that the fines themselves had in fact helped motivate operators to do better, even if by simply prompting the more competitive companies to fight to be more socially responsible than their rivals.Similarly, Kindred Group’s David Caruana argued that the fines could be seen as a form of guidance for operators.“The fact that fines are being issued suggests that the industry needs to do more to protect players,” he said. “Fines make our life easier, as it shows where we need to improve and what to address.”Joelson Law partner Richard Williams noted that high-spending VIP customers had led to a lot of issues around anti-money laundering processes and social responsibility. Many operators, he suggested, had not managed these players properly, leading to the fines. This prompted an audience member to interject that it remained unclear what regulators expect of operators.Pinnacle’s legal, compliance and regulatory affairs manager Veronique Dos Reis echoed Clifton’s point from the earlier panel and said that rather than aggressively cracking down immediately after the introduction of new regulations – and on historical offences – regulators should find more constructive ways to manage operators.’Coop-etition’ to keep lotteries alive This theme of collaboration was continued in the day’s panel on lotteries. This even saw Zeal chief executive Helmut Becker coin the world ‘coop-etition’ to describe the mix of cooperation and competition that he believed could help future-proof the vertical.Atlantic Lottery Corporation’s Jean Marc Landry said that as a state-owned operator, it had been forced to learn from the private sector as it looks to make its product more engaging for a younger, more tech-savvy demographic. This has seen ALC revamp its infrastructure to modernise its offering, with the launch of a mobile-first customer front end helping drive a 30% increase in digital sales.Lottoland chief executive Nigel Birrell said lotteries needed to be given more entrepreneurial freedom to encourage innovation, even if this meant opening up markets previously dominated by a state monopoly to multiple providers. This was echoed by The Health Lottery’s Yakir Firestane, who argued that their protected status discourages state lotteries from innovating.However, Becker flatly denied that regulation was a barrier to innovation. “We should not wait for regulations to change before innovating,” he said. “There are already huge opportunities to do so.“And we can’t blame the regulator for not innovating. We exist with boundaries, and have to work within them.”Birrell added that as an online-only brand, Lottoland was effectively competing against operators in all other verticals. This, he said, had forced it to innovate to stay competitive.Landry suggested that many state lotteries have a “legacy mindset”, with a lack of fresh voices and diversity reducing the appetite for change.But this, the panel suggested, could be aided by Becker’s ‘coop-etition’. The Health Lottery’s QuickWin game is developed by Gamevy, a business that counts Lottoland among its investors, while Zeal is also looking to aid smaller lottery start-ups with its venture capital arm Zeal Investments.While no one on the panel expected state lotteries to disappear any time soon, they agreed that the current framework, with one legal provider and no competition, was ultimately unsustainable. This, they said, would ultimately see monopoly operators fade into irrelevance.Uncertainty to hit all US verticals  The importance of clarity reappeared on a panel featuring Ohio State Senator William Coley and Greenberg Traurig’s Mark Hichar, who were discussing the Department of Justice’s revised opinion on the Wire Act. Both agreed that the uncertainty created by the reinterpretation – as covered by iGamingBusiness.com last week – would affect all gaming verticals in the states.However, Hichar suggested that the opinion was based on shaky reasoning. He pointed out that the DoJ’s Office of Legal Counsel described the act’s language as “unambiguous” despite two Circuit Court judges ruling that it only applied to sports betting, and not all forms of gambling.Interested parties have a 90-day window ending on April 15 to launch a legal challenge against the ruling, and both Coley and Hichar suggested that challenges were likely. While Coley admitted that tackling gambling legislation was something that fellow senators had described as being “like root canal surgery”, he said that a legislative fix was the only way to ensure clarity.Until then, he noted, state lotteries in particular would be under huge pressure to ensure all of their functions were carried out in-state. Even with the DoJ expected to issue enforcement guidelines as a follow-up to the opinion, neither speaker was confident that the issue would be resolved quickly.However, Hichar did suggest a potential legal fix, inspired by New Jersey. The Garden State’s constitution states that all forms of gambling effectively take place in Atlantic City. Such an approach – which means that any form of gambling in the state is considered to be happening in the east coast casino hub – could be adopted by other states, he said. Tags: Charitable Gaming Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops 5th February 2019 | By contenteditor AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Lottery Marketing & affiliates People Social responsibility Sports betting Strategy CSR Casino & games Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: Europe UK & Ireland US Email Addresslast_img read more

From responsibility to regulation

first_img Growing concerns about the rise of gambling addiction in some African nations has led to calls for more stringent regulation across the continent. Jake Pollard assesses the severity of the situation and asks two leading industry figures how they would go about tackling the problem 5th September 2019 | By contenteditor Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance People Email Address Growing concerns about the rise of gambling addiction in some African nations has led to calls for more stringent regulation across the continent. Jake Pollard assesses the severity of the situation and asks two leading industry figures how they would go about tackling the problemCorporate and social responsibility has reached such a level of prominence in 2019 that it is impossible to envisage any debate about the future of the igaming sector without discussing the subject at some length.This should come as no surprise. In Europe, and in particular the UK in recent years, we have seen the debate, and attendant criticism of the gambling industry, intensify to such levels that it seems the atmosphere and entrenched positions could not be any more pronounced.These scenarios apply to most EU markets to one degree or another, whether it is in soon-to-be or recently-regulated Holland and Sweden, or long-standing Italy and Spain.But what of Africa? CSR issues and claims that online betting has caused major problems in Kenya and Senegal, especially among young players, have been in the public sphere for some time already.The pressure created by articles from local and international media outlets depicting tales of young men spending more than they can afford and developing gambling problems have forced national authorities to act. The Uganda National Gaming Board (NGB) passed new measures in March requiring all gamblers to upload identity cards or passports to show they were at least 25 years old. The NGB said it also planned to set up a central monitoring system to track gamblers’ activities.In neighbouring Kenya, the National Assembly is considering a bill that would revamp the country’s regulatory framework for gambling, imposing significantly higher costs on licensed operators and establishing the country’s first national lottery.On 1 July, the Kenya Betting Control and Licensing Board (BCLB) suspended the licences of eight sports betting operators and refused to renew those of 19 other gambling companies. According to press reports, among the companies affected were SportPesa and Betway (both suspended) and Betin (whose renewal was reportedly rejected outright). Between them, the three control more than 80% of Kenya’s online sports betting market.But it should also be remembered that these events are occurring because of bookmakers’ aggressive marketing and dominant market positions. Their activities and growth in markets such as Kenya, Nigeria, the Ivory Coast or Senegal have attracted much coverage, most of it negative and critical, which in turn has forced the authorities to act.Without wanting to undermine the seriousness of the subject, is the situation as bad as it is made out to be? No one really knows is the true answer. There is very little reliable data that gives an accurate picture of the situation in the region.Operators are also highly reluctant to divulge any information, other than to refute or deny the worst of the allegations made about them or their owners. iGaming Business approached some of the betting operators working in Kenya and Ivory Coast for comment but they did not respond.Lottotech operates the national lottery in Mauritius. For managing director Michelle Carinci, minimising harm “through player protection programmes can only be effective if there is collaboration among all stakeholders – the regulator, law enforcement, operators, retailers, researchers, health departments and the community at large”.She adds: “Sports betting, for example, may attract underage players who love sports. It is critical that parents play their role and educate their children about the risk and possible harm associated with gambling at too young an age, which means parents must be educated [about these issues].If players understood the true odds and mechanics behind video lottery games or slot machines, they would be better positioned to make informed choices about their gambling behaviours.”The issues also play out at a societal level. Gambling can have a positive impact on how citizens approach and, as mentioned by Carinci, understand the mechanics of gambling and their own playing behaviours.“Two years ago, we aligned with UN sustainable development goals (SDG) focusing on work and economic growth; responsible consumption and production through responsible gambling programmes and partnerships; gender equality; quality education and climate action,” she says.“All those activities rely also on one important SDG and that is SDG 17, which is about partnership. With the help and involvement of multiple stakeholders, our efforts and programmes are more impactful.”Carinci explains that the SDGs were selected because they align with the societal needs of Mauritius.“In 2018, Mauritius was ranked 109 out of 149 for gender equality and diversity, demonstrating the need for action.
The education system in Mauritius has resulted in an increasing number of young students dropping out of school. Lottotech therefore supports schools that are funded by NGOs which provide a second chance to these same students. Goals should now be set aligning with the national needs.”The point Carinci is making is that real progress can only be achieved when stakeholders, including private operators, take a concerted and holistic approach to the issue.She adds: “We strongly believe that having employees involved in CSR projects provides another dimension which encourages them to be good corporate citizens and at the same time instils pride in working at Lottotech where we strive to make a difference in our communities.”For igaming consultant John Kamara of Global Gaming Africa, “responsible gambling is a huge conversation at the moment and the truth is that most African operators have failed to really understand its magnitude, which has led to some of the problems we are seeing with regulators and policy makers.”Kamara adds that operators should self-regulate and own the message of responsible gambling and communal CSR. With regard to what is happening in Kenya, he says: “It’s important to understand that the government is also reacting to the industry. Most emerging market governments are learning about gaming and they respond to how the industry presents the sector. Everyone needs to sit around the table and have a proper discussion about the way forward.”However, he believes things “will calm down and a clearer position for the industry will be achieved”.For Lottotech’s Carinci, the discussion should centre on a government’s “obligation to protect its citizens”.She goes on: “Around the world we see governments regulating industries that have the possibility to cause harm. Gambling is one of those. Unregulated operators have operated for decades. The internet and mobile gaming have enabled grey market gambling to grow at an unprecedented pace.“Some countries have given these grey operators the opportunity to become regulated operators and adhere to all the principles of responsible gambling and player protection. Other countries have taken steps to block [unlicensed] operators. We don’t believe prohibition is an effective way of protecting the public and in the long term it will not work.”As for whether the days of aggressive marketing and hyper-fast growth are over for many online operators in markets such as Kenya, Uganda or Senegal, Carinci is forthright.“One thing I think is evident: the aggressive and sometimes reckless marketing attracting minors into gambling activities, not paying heed to responsible gambling practices, the threat of money laundering and fraud, have all contributed to governments and society taking note,” she says.All this is a similar paradox to what has happened in many European markets over the past 20 years: witness the obvious example of a highly regulated market like the UK and the new Gambling Act that came into effect in 2007.Along with FOBTs on the high street, it is marketing and sports sponsorship (i.e. operators’ most visible activities) that provoke the most outrage from industry critics and subsequent action from the authorities – and even from the industry, in the form of the whistle- to-whistle ad ban set up by the major UK bookmakers.Therefore, it would be logical to see African governments erecting further barriers or blocking illegal or grey operators as they turn their focus towards establishing their own effective regulations.For Carinci this would be a positive as it “potentially would provide grey operators the opportunity to become legitimate operators, protecting and contributing to the societies within which they operate.“The more the media, community workers, health officials, regulatory bodies and the public are engaged in a dialogue, the more likely we will see a transformation in many countries that have up until now treated the issue and subject with benign neglect.“When it comes to the growth potential of markets, the right gambling model will ensure that any market will have moderate sustainable growth for the foreseeable future.”John Kamara and Lottotech’s responsible gaming strategy lead, Virginie Pasnin, will be discussing “Tackling Responsible Gambling and Public Perception for a Sustainable African Gaming Industry’ at 11:15 on Day 1 at this year’s ICE Africa, taking place on 2-3 October. To find out more and to register go here. Tags: Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops From responsibility to regulation Casino & games AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Regions: Africa East Africa Kenya Mauritius Uganda Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

Episcopal Relief & Development highlights partners in Nicaragua

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Relief & Development highlights partners in Nicaragua Submit a Job Listing [Episcopal Relief & Development] This month’s Power of Partnerships celebrates the success of an agricultural program in San Fransisco Libre, Nicaragua, where Episcopal Relief & Development partner organization CEPAD has engaged farmers in developing a set of best practices that work with the local environment. Rocky soil and scant rainfall pose challenges, but by employing innovative water and soil conservation techniques, the farmers are improving the quality of the soil and increasing the productivity of the land.  By growing more diverse crops and reaping bigger harvests, families are able to increase household nutrition and sell their surplus produce for income which they can invest in land, equipment and education for their children.Please note that the Power of Partnerships and Friends of Episcopal Relief & Development web features are now on an alternating schedule.  The next Friends of Episcopal Relief & Development will be published in December.The Power of Partnerships and Friends of Episcopal Relief & Development web features present stories about the agency’s partners in the US and worldwide. Visit www.er-d.org to read past installments, find information about our programs or make a contribution.  You can also call 1.855.312.HEAL (4325). Gifts can be mailed to Episcopal Relief & Development, PO Box 7058, Merrifield, VA 22116-7058. Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 center_img Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Nov 16, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Relief & Development Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

Episcopal Migration Ministries hosts World Refugee Day interfaith conversation

first_img The Rev. Stephanie Spellers, canon to the presiding bishop for evangelism, reconciliation and creation, left, Rabbi Victor Urecki, of B’nai Jacob Synagogue in Charleston, West Virginia, center, and Hani Hamwi, of Islamic Relief USA, during a June 20 interfaith panel discussion for World Refugee Day.  Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Judaism, like all religious traditions, calls Rabbi Victor Urecki to welcome the stranger, the refugee. In the Torah, God tells the Jews no less than 36 times to “love the strangers in their midst,” reminding them they were once strangers in Egypt, he said.Still, it’s not Urecki’s Jewish faith that drives him to welcome and to assist refugees arriving in Charleston, West Virginia. “As a Jew, I feel I’m called to be there for refugees because the refugee story is very personal for Jews,” said Urecki, a West Virginia Interfaith Refugee Ministry adviser. “It’s my people’s story. The image of every refugee should be an image imprinted on every Jew’s heart.”Urecki spoke on a six-person panel during a June 20 interfaith conversation and prayer for World Refugee Day hosted by Episcopal Migration Ministries at the Episcopal Church Center in New York. An iftar, the meal eaten by Muslims after sunset during Ramadan, followed the panel conversation. (The holy month of Ramadan, observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting to commemorate the first revelation of the Qur’an to Muhammad, began May 26 and ends June 24.)EMM encouraged congregations across the country to host similar interfaith conversations, and the June 20 panel was recorded on video for future use, said moderator Allison Duvall, EMM’s manager for church relations and engagement.The refugee narrative is encoded in Jews’ spiritual DNA. They were forced to flee pogroms in Europe, withstood anti-Semitism and hatred across the globe and endured centuries of war and bloodshed. “We’ve been swept up as bystanders and brutalized as victims. We’ve been killed in our homelands … because of who we were, what we believed and what we practiced,” said Urecki, an immigrant whose grandparents and father were refugees.Refugees are forced to flee because of who they are, what they believe and their religious practices, as another panelist confirmed. Anastasia Orlova is an asylum seeker from Russia. She arrived in the United States last October with her wife. Russia’s intolerance of LGBT people meant the couple kept few close friends, and Orlova would tell acquaintances she had a husband. She didn’t realize how depressed she was until she left Russia.“When you are scared or ashamed of yourself, you live in inner isolation,” Orlova said. In the United States, Orlova and her wife can be married legally, practice their beliefs and speak up for themselves. “Here in the U.S. we finally feel protected.”Refugees on the panel acknowledged that though they feel secure and free to be themselves in the United States, the country’s polarized politics and overarching economic and security fears are worrisome. The Trump administration has sought to suspend and reduce the U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program; as a result, EMM was forced to reduce its resettlement work.“Maybe the stakes now are so high and the fear is so deep and the walls are so thick that the only way we can heal the soul of a nation is for a wider-than-ever circle of allies to gather around to stand with refugee and resettlement agencies,” said the Rev. Stephanie Spellers, canon to the presiding bishop for evangelism, reconciliation and creation. Spellers represented the Episcopal Church on the panel.In Charleston, for example, West Virginia Interfaith Refugee Ministry operates, “in the heart of Trump country,” said Urecki. But if anything gives him hope, it’s that the people, even those who fear for their security and the economy, are open to conversation. “If you can get your foot in the door and have a conversation, you can win,” he said.West Virginia Interfaith Refugee Ministry became an EMM affiliate in December.As the Episcopal Church’s refugee resettlement agency, EMM is one of nine agencies partnered with the U.S. State Department to welcome and resettle refugees; it operates 31 resettlement affiliates in 26 dioceses, providing direct assistance to recent arrivals. The Episcopal Church has worked to resettle refugees since the 1930s. The federal government formalized the U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program in 1980, partnering with religious and secular organizations to provide direct assistance to newly arrived refugees in communities nationwide. Six of the government’s resettlement partners are faith-based; the program has historically, for the most part, enjoyed bipartisan support. Over the last two years, however, Americans’ attitudes toward refugees have begun to shift from quiet acceptance to fear of the other.Recently, EMM held a conference to train refugee supporters as advocates. EMM also offers ways for congregations to engage in refugee resettlement in their communities. The agency encourages Episcopalians to join the Episcopal Public Policy Network and advocate for policies that protect the rights of refugees and asylum seekers.World Refugee Day is held annually on June 20; the day is set aside to commemorate the strength, courage and perseverance of millions of refugees. An unprecedented 65.6 million people have been forcibly displaced worldwide. Among them 22.5 million have received refugee status and less than 1 percent will be resettled. Over half of all refugees are younger than 18 years old. Many were born in refugee camps where the average stay is 20 years.-Lynette Wilson is managing editor of the Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments are closed. Episcopal Migration Ministries, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Lynette Wilson says: Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA June 22, 2017 at 1:52 pm PJ, I agreed but there is no open, intellectually honest discussions with progressive liberals. We will need to become Europe before they realize the mistake they’ve made. By then it will be too late. The only way to stop this madness is to stop funding the Episcopal Diocese which funds the EMM. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bill Louis says: June 23, 2017 at 1:27 pm True Lynette, but the salaries and benefits for the 30 EMM employees from the 3 year 2015 budget totaled over $7.3M I believe thats about a 12% raise over the previous 3 year budget. So we are paying them to spend our tax money on resettiling refugees. June 25, 2017 at 10:49 pm Not sure where you are getting your numbers, but the salaries and benefits of EMM staff members are not paid by Episcopal Church funds. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (5) Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL World Refugee Day Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ecumenical & Interreligious, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Lynette Wilson Posted Jun 21, 2017 Refugees Migration & Resettlement, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC PJCabbiness says: Episcopal Migration Ministries hosts World Refugee Day interfaith conversation #StandTogether #WithRefugees Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bill Louis says: Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Frank Collier says: June 23, 2017 at 11:00 am EMM receives 99.5 percent of its funding from the federal government. EMM partners with the government to resettle refugees through the U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program. It is one of nine agencies, six of them faith-based, that partner with the federal government to resettle refugees. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest June 21, 2017 at 4:40 pm Misguided, theologically misinterpreted political activism in action. It is time to reject the leftist narrative and to have an open, intellectually honest discussion and debate on this critical issue. Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

New Director of External Relations at National Society for Epilepsy

first_img Howard Lake | 24 October 2002 | News  63 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The National Society for Epilepsy (NSE) has appointed David Josephs to the newly-created post of Director of External Relations.Josephs is currently Managing Director of Citigate Technology, the specialist PR division of Incepta. Before that he was corporate and trusts donor development manager with NSPCC.The new post will bring together fundraising, external and international communications and information services. This restructuring comes as the society launches a £1.5 million appeal to purchase a new MRI scanner. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img New Director of External Relations at National Society for Epilepsy About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Dormant Accounts releases €800,000 for social enterprise training

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis7  223 total views,  3 views today Advertisement Dormant Accounts releases €800,000 for social enterprise training Dormant Accounts funding is being made available by the Irish minister for Rural and Community Development for social enterprise training.Minister Michael Ring has announced a call for applications from national, regional or local organisations and statutory bodies or institutions to deliver tailored training to new and existing social enterprises. Funding of €800,000 will be made available from the Social Enterprise Measure of the Dormant Accounts Fund (DAF) and is aimed at developing capacity building for social enterprises in Ireland, particularly in relation to enterprise development.The aim of the Social Enterprise measure, which is overseen by the Department and administered by Pobal, is to increase the impact of social enterprises by enhancing their capacity to deliver services and generate trade income through the provision of tailored supports.Applications for the delivery of training and mentoring to social enterprises are being invited from organisations to enable growth and improve sustainability and to increase social, societal and environmental impact.Minister Ring said: “I am delighted to be in a position today to announce the allocation of €800,000 from the Dormant Accounts Fund to pilot this training initiative and deliver on the commitment made in the National Social Enterprise Policy. Up to 300 participants are likely to benefit from these supports over the next year.”Successful applicants must deliver suitable projects between 1st December 2019 and 30th June 2020. The minimum grant that each applicant can apply for is €30,000 and the maximum is €100,000.Activities likely to be supportedPobal has provided a list of typical activities that will be considered as part of a successful project:• Assessment of the training and support needs of individual social enterprises.• Practical skills workshops or courses in “Running a business”. For example, human resources, social enterprise business planning, marketing, growing the social enterprise/diversification strategies, social media, digital innovation, accounting, leadership, procurement, and developing the diversity of the workforce.• Workshops on sourcing funding, finance or investment.• One to one business coaching and mentoring, tailored to meet the needs of the social enterprise.• Workshops on meeting legislative and legal requirements and governance.• Specialist advice for social enterprise i.e. tailored to specific types social enterprises.• Practical peer to peer learning workshops.• Workshops on “how to measure the social impact of your social enterprise”.• Workshops on financial management and planning for growth and expansion.The Dormant Accounts Fund (DAF) was established by legislation and enables unclaimed funds from accounts in credit institutions in Ireland to be used to support the socially disadvantaged, people educationally disadvantaged and those with disability.Application forms and guidance will be available on the Pobal website. The closing date for applications is 30 September 2019 at 3pm. Tagged with: dormant accounts Funding Irelandcenter_img  224 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis7 Howard Lake | 11 September 2019 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Five press freedom organizations issue joint appeal to United Nations

first_img Sri Lanka: tamil reporter held on absurd terrorism charge March 8, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Five press freedom organizations issue joint appeal to United Nations Sri LankaAsia – Pacific Organisation Related documents mar_7_sri_lanka_letter-2.pdfPDF – 66.49 KB News Read the letter : News July 29, 2020 Find out more January 13, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Sri Lanka: Journalist manhandled by notorious police inspector currently on trialcenter_img Reporters Without Borders, the Committee to Protect Journalists, Cartoonists Rights Network International, International Media Support and the International Federation of Journalists released a joint letter today urging United Nations secretary-general Ban Ki-moon to support Sandhya Eknelygoda’s battle to find out what happened to her husband, Sri Lankan cartoonist Prageeth Eknelygoda, who went missing more than a year ago in Colombo. News Sri Lanka: RSF signs joint statement on attacks against human rights defenders, lawyers and journalists Help by sharing this information to go further July 15, 2020 Find out more Sri LankaAsia – Pacific News Receive email alerts Follow the news on Sri Lankalast_img read more

Denial of visas and harassment of journalists sympathetic to Sichuan Quake victims

first_img April 27, 2021 Find out more September 4, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Denial of visas and harassment of journalists sympathetic to Sichuan Quake victims See the interview given to HBO last May: Reporters Without Borders deplores the Chinese government’s refusal to issue visas to two US filmmakers, Jon Alpert and Matthew O’Neill, thereby preventing them from attending yesterday’s screening of their documentary about the May 2008 Sichuan earthquake, “China’s Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province” at the Beijing Independent Film Festival. The film examines the collapse of many schools in the earthquake and the difficulties encountered by the families of the victims in addressing their complaints to the government.“Their kids had been buried when the school collapsed,” Alpert said in a recent interview, explaining a scene in the documentary (). “In their town, almost all the other buildings remained standing (…) And the parents began asking why the school collapsed. Was it a shoddy construction, was it corruption? And nobody gave them any answer. They started to get angry and started marching.”Reporters Without Borders said: “While screening the documentary at a Beijing festival is laudable, denying visas to its two American makers is absurd. It is linked to the growing difficulties for foreign journalists and Chinese human rights activists to work in the areas affected by the earthquake. The openness displayed at the time of the quake is now unfortunately over.”Officials at the Chinese consulate in New York offered Alpert and O’Neill no explanation for the refusal to give them visas late last week but it was almost certainly linked to their film about the aftermath of the earthquake that devastated the southwestern province of Sichuan on 12 May 2008 and their work with its victims.Alpert and O’Neill arrived in Fuxin, near the Sichuan capital of Chengdu, 10 days after the earthquake. O’Neill told Reporters Without Borders about the grief and anger of the parents of children who were killed when Fuxin School No. 2 collapsed. “By the end of the week, we feltthat the police were monitoring all the school sites and all the parents we were speaking with,” he said, adding: “We decided to send a copy of our footage out of the country.”They sent the footage to HBO, the network for which they made the documentary. The decision was fortuitous because on their return to Chengdu: “We were surprised to be surroundedby approximately 30 plainclothes police men and women (…) We spent the next 8 hours at the Chengdu police headquarters where we were interrogated.”O’Neill hailed the courage and determination of the Beijing Independent Film Festival’s organisers. “The parents had been hoping that our presence (at the festival) might force the authorities to take a public position on the causes of their children’s deaths.” Eighteen months later, acting as a spokesperson for the families of the victims has become very risky. Huang Qi, a Chinese cyber-dissident who criticised the organisation of relief aid on his website, has been jailed since June 2008 on a charge of “illegal possession of state secrets.” To see the latest communiqué about HuangBlogger Tan Zuoren has been held since 28 March on a charge of inciting state subversion () for trying to calculate the number of children killed in the quake, for which no official figure has ever been given. Police prevented two Hong Kong journalists, Wong Ka-yu and Wu Siu-wing from covering the opening of his trial in Chengdu on 12 August by not letting them leave their hotel. Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, who had wanted to testify in his favour, was also prevented from leaving his hotel.Many foreign journalists were manhandled and expelled from the worst-hit areas on the first anniversary of the earthquake.Other censorshipWith less than a month to go to celebrations planned for the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China on 1 October, censorship is increasing.The Propaganda Department has ordered the Chinese media to carry only the official news agency Xinhua’s version of the situation on the Burmese border, where around 30,000 Burmese civilians have reportedly fled the country following clashes between Burmese government forces and rebel groups. Foreign journalists have been prevented from entering refugee camps on the Chinese side of the border.The Communist Party’s censors also instructed the leading news media not to cover the recent protests and rioting about serious cases of pollution in the southern provinces of Fujian and Yunnan. News March 12, 2021 Find out more News ChinaAsia – Pacific Help by sharing this information to go further Receive email alerts June 2, 2021 Find out more ChinaAsia – Pacific China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures Follow the news on China Organisation News News RSF_en last_img read more

Appfire Announces Acquisition of Bolo Software

first_img Facebook Twitter WhatsApp By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 Local NewsBusiness Appfire Announces Acquisition of Bolo Software Pinterest BOSTON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 24, 2021– Appfire, a leading provider of apps for software development teams, today announced the acquisition of Bolo Software, an Atlassian Marketplace application provider. As part of the acquisition, Bolo Software founder, Jason Boileau, will join Appfire’s team of technologists. Jason brings several years of experience in developing products that help teams create and share content in Confluence. “I’m really excited to be a part of Appfire, as Randall and team share the same mission of putting customer needs first,” said Jason Boileau. “Appfire has a dedicated and talented team that will help ensure that the Bolo Software apps continue to serve the needs of the Atlassian community now and well into the future.” Since 2012, Bolo Software has created innovative solutions that help organizations use Atlassian products to their full potential. Bolo’s line of publication apps includes LaTeX Math, a popular solution that provides enterprise teams with math formatting on Confluence pages including adding equations and units to pages. Other Bolo Software products include Numbered Captions and Easy Numbered Headings. “At Appfire, we look for the best product builders and encourage them to solve important customer challenges,” said Randall Ward, co-founder and CEO, Appfire. “I’m excited to welcome Jason to Appfire. He brings a decade of experience building and scaling Atlassian apps and has the passion and technology strategy expertise that will help us rapidly build out our publishing category of apps into the future.” Kirkland & Ellis LLP served as legal counsel to Appfire. About Appfire Appfire is an award-winning Atlassian Platinum Marketplace Partner and has been a global authority in the Atlassian ecosystem for more than 15 years. Appfire’s popular Artemis, Beecom, Bob Swift, Bolo, Botron, Feed Three, Innovalog, and Wittified product brands comprise the largest portfolio of apps on the Atlassian Marketplace with 85+ purpose-built products and over 110,000 active installations worldwide. Learn more at www.appfire.com View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210224005184/en/ CONTACT: Kim Pegnato Appfire (781) 835-7118 [email protected] KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA MASSACHUSETTS INDUSTRY KEYWORD: NETWORKS INTERNET DATA MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY SOFTWARE SOURCE: Appfire Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/24/2021 08:05 AM/DISC: 02/24/2021 08:05 AM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210224005184/encenter_img Facebook Pinterest Twitter Previous articleDWS Launches U.S. Market’s First S&P MidCap 400 ESG and S&P SmallCap 600 ESG ETFsNext articlesweetgreen Pledges to Be Carbon Neutral by 2027 Digital AIM Web Support TAGS  WhatsApplast_img read more

ArtTalk to be a ‘Joyous Exchange’

first_imgSkip You Might Like Community mourns loss of student Pike County and the Troy University community continued to mourn Saturday’s loss a Trojan football player. Corey McCullers, a Troy… read more Sponsored Content Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Latest Stories ArtTalk to be a ‘Joyous Exchange’ Orlofsky wrote the book at intervals as she sat with her dying father. The words were lyrical and she could hear the music as she wrote. Memories and music filled the pages.Reading it, Johnson became so moved that his commitment was not to just illustrate a book for Orlofsky but to illuminate the words that she had penned in such a way that both the artwork and the words would take on a spiritual quality – that the words would be illuminated through a “joyous exchange.”Johnson and Orlofsky will be featured at ArtTalk along with the their colleague Pam Allen from 5 until 7 p.m. Thursday at the Johnson Center for the Arts. The public is invited. By Blood Sugar Blaster Print Article Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day By Jaine Treadwell Messenger photo/Jaine TreadwellJerry Johnson and Diane Orlofsky, along with Pam Allen, will be featured at ArtTalk from 5 until 7 p.m. Thursday at the Johnson Center. The public is invited to attend the “Joyous Exchange” among the artists.Jerry Johnson had only to sit with Diane Orlofsky a short time before he realized that what she was asking, he could not do.Orlofsky and Johnson are professors at Troy University. She is a choral conductor and he is a professor of design. Orlofsky’s request of her friend was that he illustrate a book she had written, titled “Meditations.”“Diane’s book was not one to be illustrated,” Johnson said. “It was one to be illuminated.” Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel “These illuminations brought great freedom to me as an artist to arrange compositions that explore relationships between the predictable and the unpredictable,” Johnson said. “I have attempted stay true to the Joyous Exchange by joyfully connecting disparate elements to achieve some range of believability or not.”Allen’s artwork is equally intriguing as she conveys much of her life through the incorporation of simple elements.Her grandmother’s quilt pattern, which she illustrates so vividly, is also a focus of Johnson’s work and Orlofsky’s words.“When asked, I usually say that my work is about life, which can sound a little narcissistic,” Allen said. “But, in truth, it is about family and the deeply rooted values passed from generations.”Vicki Pritchett, Johnson Center executive director, said for those who attend the Johnson Center Orlofsky and Allen ArtTalk Thursday will have a unique opportunity to be a part of the “joyous exchange” between gifted artists,one a graphic designer, one other, a music maker and one a painter who ventures to try new mediums.“The ArtTalks make the artwork personal and those who attend the ArtTalk on Thursday will immediately connect with them as they talk about the pieces in the show and how they found a way to make each one a joyous exchange through the art of collaboration,” Pritchett said. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Email the author Md: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) Book Nook to reopen Published 2:00 am Wednesday, June 24, 2015 Johnson and Orlofsky will talk about the 13 pieces that were co-created over more than year’s time.They will talk about Johnson’s desire to take the simple elements of Orlofsky’s life and create designs that not only tells her stories but encompass the passion and the spiritual quality of her life.“My dad played the violin until he was 12 years old. Then he had to go and work the fruit and vegetable truck,” Orlofsky said as she shared the story that inspired one of Johnson’s creations. “The only song my dad and I sang together was ‘Just a Closer Walk With Thee’ and there are elements of the needlepoint cushion I stood on to deliver dramatic readings when I was a child. It’s all there, the violin, the song, the needlepoint. It’s my story.”Each of the 13 pieces, each of the “joyous exchanges” has deep meaning not only for Orlofsky but also for Johnson.last_img read more