Premier calling for better positioning and visibility of Police officers

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Bishop says peace & prosperity is everybody’s responsibility at Law Enforcers Church Service Increased Police presence promised, TCI Police Commissioner statement on recent shootings Beaches puts former Premier on blast about controversial pier Related Items:commissioner of Police, james smith, police officers, premier rufus ewing, visibility Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 25 Jun 2015 – Police officers’ welfare came up when the Premier and the Commissioner of Police met earlier in the week.“But when you have more bodies on the streets and visible, then you would be able to relegate those persons who are more specially skilled into the proper areas where they ought to be.”It seems Government is ready to not only work with the Force to ensure there is better distribution of skills sets, but they are prepared to finance some changes. “We’ll be looking at and addressing to see how and to what extent we can support, give financial support to that initiative and also in the area to have better working conditions.”More hours on the streets will improve police visibility and police viability says Hon Rufus Ewing. “We need to get more police officers from behind the desks and on the streets in the communities.”There may have to be consideration given to delegating people outside of the Police Force to get tip information since the prevailing view of the public is that Police are not confidential about tipsters. The Premier believes these may be isolated instances but Hon Ewing explained that he has recommended to Commissioner James Smith that he surround himself with advisers and to employ the know-how of retired officers who can help to change the current climate on information sharing.last_img read more

Newsweek to Cut a Dozen Staffers

first_imgIt may seem like small potatoes compared to the massive rounds of layoffs that have rocked publishing houses like Condé Nast and Time Inc. in recent weeks, but it appears that Newsweek is bracing for another round of job cuts.According to a memo from the magazine’s top editor Jon Meacham, “about a dozen” positions will be eliminated. “As much as we would like it to be otherwise, market conditions mean that we are going to have to do our work with fewer people,” he wrote.A Newsweek spokesperson did not immediately return a request for comment. Late last year, FOLIO: reported that Newsweek was considering a major overhaul, including a dramatic reduction in rate base. In May, the magazine unveiled a redesign and an editorial shift from news to news analysis.Through the first nine months of 2009, Newsweek saw ad pages fall 29.2 percent, according to PIB figures. Through the third quarter, Newsweek parent the Washington Post Co. reported a $29.7 million operating loss for its magazine publishing division (which includes Budget Travel magazine), compared to a loss of $27 million during the same quarter last year.Newsweek reduced its workforce by 44 people during the first quarter as a result of a voluntary retirement incentive the company offered in late 2008.Below is Meacham’s entire memo, via Politico:To the Staff From Jon Meacham This has been a tough day for the magazine. Because the economic climate in publishing has become ever more difficult, we have been compelled by business considerations to eliminate about a dozen positions. We are parting company with colleagues who have done much to serve the magazine and its readers. As much as we would like it to be otherwise, market conditions mean that we are going to have to do our work with fewer people. I have no spin to offer. I will say this, though: our new magazine and website have been well received by readers. The different direction we undertook earlier this year continues to appear promising in terms of building and retaining an engaged audience that we hope will be attractive to advertisers while we, like so many other organizations, seek new sources of revenue in order to fulfill our mission. Our situation is not unique. But we will keep working as hard as we can to find solutions that are. In the meantime, thanks to you all for the work you have done and will do. To those who are leaving, we will miss you, and we wish you the very best.last_img read more

Wilmington OBITUARIES Week of June 2 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are the obituaries published on Wilmington Apple during the week of June 2, 2019:Lived In Wilmington At Time Of Passing:Robert “Bob” Alan Coste, 59Joseph “Joe” J. Parrella, 66Previously Lived In Wilmington:Gary B. Balser, 74Worked In/Volunteered In/Connected To Wilmington:NoneLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington OBITUARIES (Week of June 23, 2019)In “Obituaries”Wilmington OBITUARIES (Week of August 18, 2019)In “Obituaries”Wilmington OBITUARIES (Week of August 11, 2019)In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Synthetic Genomics unveils digitaltobiological converter using digital DNA to print biologics

first_img What if you could launch a machine aboard a rocket to Mars and then transmit information describing a life form, which the machine then “prints?” That is what the team at SG envisions. Or more practically, they envision sending the digitized DNA of a deadly virus from a remote outbreak zone to a research lab that uses the information to develop a vaccine. Once created, the same converter machine could then be used to print the material for creating the vaccine locally.The device is actually a hodgepodge of smaller devices that contribute to the whole. One of the main pieces is the BioXP 3200—a synthetic DNA printer that is already marketed around the world to researchers who use it to easily create synthetic DNA samples. The rest of the pieces receive information and process it and deal with the printed materials—the head of the project at SG, for example, can send a message from his office to the machine and then walk over and collect a virus it has created. This is not a means for creating life, the researchers note, because viruses are not considered forms of life. Instead, it is described as a “digital to biological converter for on-demand production of biologics.”Researchers at SG have used the device to remotely synthesize viruses and claim they are on the cusp of doing the same with a so-called minimal cell, a major step toward remotely printing material for creating living organisms. But first, they have to fix what they describe as an unacceptable rate of mutations.In their paper and announcement, the company highlights the positive uses for the machine, but notably avoid mentioning the negative—the ability to use the machine to produce a virus at a given location that could be released as a biological weapon. Citation: Synthetic Genomics unveils digital-to-biological converter using digital DNA to print biologics (2017, August 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-08-synthetic-genomics-unveils-digital-to-biological-digital.html Credit: CC0 Public Domain Using machine vision for 3-D printing © 2017 Phys.org More information: Kent S Boles et al. Digital-to-biological converter for on-demand production of biologics, Nature Biotechnology (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nbt.3859center_img Journal information: Nature Biotechnology This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A team of researchers at Synthetic Genomics (SG) has unveiled a machine they call a digital-to-biological converter—it sends digitized information describing DNA, RNA or a protein to a device that prints out synthesized versions of the original material. The team has published a paper describing their creation in the journal Nature Biotechnology. Explore furtherlast_img read more