Xiaomis newest phone costs just over 100

first_img Post a comment 0 Samsung showed off its Galaxy Fold phone-tablet hybrid last February, but it was outshone even earlier than that by Xiaomi’s own foldable effort. The Chinese electronics maker is hoping to show it’s a company that can do even more: Not only compete with super-premium devices from bigger companies, but make phones for those on a budget.Xiaomi on Monday revealed its latest phone, the Redmi 7. Starting at 699 Chinese yuan, or just $105, AU$145 or £80, the slick-looking device manages to be notably inexpensive even in an increasingly crowded field of inexpensive phones.For that price you’ll get a 6.26-inch device powered by an octa-core Snapdragon 632, 2GB of RAM and 16GB of storage. There’s a 12-megapixel and 2-megapixel dual-camera combo at the back, with an 8-megapixel camera up front. For some extra cash, you can get a Redmi 7 with more memory; 3GB RAM and 32GB storage fetches 799 yuan ($120, AU$170 £89), while 4GB and 64GB will cost 999 yuan ($150, AU$190, £100). 2:51 The phone is a little brother of sorts to Xiaomi’s Redmi Note 7 Pro, which has a 48-megapixel rear camera and is powered by a Snapdragon 675 processor and 6GB RAM.Those looking for a bargain will, as with all Xiaomi phones, have to import one from China, India or Europe, where Xiaomi officially sells its phones. If you’re in the US and looking for a great phone that doesn’t break the bank, check out the Moto G6 or Moto G6 Play. Xiaomi Redmi Now playing: Watch this: Share your voice Phones Review • Xiaomi’s ultra-budget Redmi shines for Asia Tags Xiaomi Mi 9 hands-on Xiaomi Samsunglast_img read more

Using catalysts like tweezers to select single enantiomer from a mirrored pair

first_img © 2017 Phys.org Explore further (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Harvard University has developed a catalytic technique that allows for selecting a single enantiomer (mirror-image isomers) when choosing between one of two mirrored possibilities. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their technique and the possible ways it might be used. Anita Mattson with Worcester Polytechnic Institute offers a Perspective piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue along with a discussion of why such work is important. Citation: Using catalysts like tweezers to select single enantiomer from a mirrored pair (2017, November 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-11-catalysts-tweezers-enantiomer-mirrored-pair.html As Mattson notes, using a catalyst to synthesize desired molecules has become a vital part of modern manufacturing processes—approximately 90 percent of all such reactions rely on a catalyst, she says. As she also notes, catalytic methods for creating chiral molecules in the form of mirror image isomers has also become very important in applications such as making pharmaceutical drugs or chemicals for use in agriculture. But, as she further notes, quite often, only one of the resultant molecules from the pair is desired (because they are not normally the same, biologically speaking)—thus, researchers require a means for selecting only the one that is needed. In this new effort, the team at Harvard has developed such a technique.In their approach, the team used molecular catalysts that had two closely set nitrogen-hydrogen groups as a sort of miniature tweezers, latching (by activating a carbon middle) onto a leaving group (using double hydrogen bonding) to pluck them away, leaving behind undesired material. The result was an ion pair that was biased to favor the one that was desired based on the shape of the catalyst. The group reports that they used their technique to set off a Lewis acid co-catalyst that pulled a leaving group off silicon rather than carbon. They suggest their technique is better for setting off reactions that involve weaker leaving groups on carbon. Mattson suggests that the new technique could be used by other researchers to help in the discovery of new catalyst combinations, perhaps leading to new complex molecular products. More information: Steven M. Banik et al. Lewis acid enhancement by hydrogen-bond donors for asymmetric catalysis, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aao5894AbstractSmall-molecule dual hydrogen-bond (H-bond) donors such as ureas, thioureas, squaramides, and guanidinium ions enjoy widespread use as effective catalysts for promoting a variety of enantioselective reactions. However, these catalysts are only weakly acidic and therefore require highly reactive electrophilic substrates to be effective. We introduce here a mode of catalytic activity with chiral H-bond donors that enables enantioselective reactions of relatively unreactive electrophiles. Squaramides are shown to interact with silyl triflates by binding the triflate counterion to form a stable, yet highly Lewis acidic, complex. The silyl triflate-chiral squaramide combination promotes the generation of oxocarbenium intermediates from acetal substrates at low temperatures. Enantioselectivity in nucleophile additions to the cationic intermediates is then controlled through a network of noncovalent interactions between the squaramide catalyst and the oxocarbenium triflate.center_img Journal information: Science Banik et al. show that a compound that makes hydrogen bonds to a Lewis acid creates an active catalyst. An example of a cycloaddition reaction is depicted. Tf, triflate; t-Bu, tert-butyl; Me, methyl; R, alkyl. Credit: (c) 2017 A. Kitterman/Science Using a nickel catalyst with hydrocarbons to make fatty acids This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more