Last remaining skating rink in City of San Diego fights for survival

first_imgLast remaining skating rink in City of San Diego fights for survival March 11, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – They were ready for stand and be counted. Ready to fight City Hall with all they have. But then, City Hall backed off, at least for now.“The City council cancelled the meeting to approve the sale so the rally has been postponed as well”, says Brett Stang, owner of the only Skating rink left in the City of San Diego.Skateworld has been around for 45-years, generations of families have lifetime memories. It appears the city’s need for another ‘big box’ store is more important than a local landmark, and something seems fishy.City Council member Scott Sherman says it was simply a matter of “highest bid”. “They were part of the bidding process and we took the highest bid, they were not the highest bid”, says Sherman.But that might not be the case. The owners of Skateworld say they offered more than five million dollars for the land, it’s not worth nearly that much. But they also says they would have gone higher, if given the chance. They were not given the chance. “Skateworld and it’s investors were willing to go higher, we are still willing to go higher, but it stopped. It just stopped”, says Stang.KUSI has requested information about ‘why’ the council meeting was ‘suddenly cancelled”. The office of Georgette Gomez says the information is on the way.As for Civic San Diego, crickets. No answer, no response, no interest. Civic San Diego is the group created by the Mayor to sell off “taxpayer property”, otherwise called ‘City Land”. Since they conduct their business in the dark, we have requested some light. KUSI has filed a “Freedom of Information Request” to get the records and the various bids.Skateland is not just a revenue stream, it’s a pivotal part of that community. The only family entertainment within miles.So here we go again. It’s the Big Box versus the Little Guy. If the little guy ends up losing, we all want to know why. Posted: March 11, 2019 Dan Plante, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Dan Plante last_img read more

Amazon launches free adsupported music service for Alexa devices

first_img Smart Home Mentioned Above Google Home News • Black Mirror season 5 has three new trailers to stress you out today Preview • For your consideration: Google Home seeks employment as your family’s Rosie the robot Walmart 0 Google Home $69 Crutchfield See It $79 Post a commentcenter_img See It The service is geared toward customers who own Alexa-enabled devices, like the Echo Dot, but aren’t Prime members or subscribers to Amazon Music Unlimited. Ben Fox Rubin/CNET Amazon on Thursday launched a new music service for its Alexa devices that’s free to use but includes ads.The service, available starting today in the US, will provide access to top Amazon Music playlists and thousands of stations. It’s specifically geared for customers who own Alexa-enabled devices but aren’t Prime members or subscribers to Amazon Music Unlimited.Amazon’s Prime membership service, which costs $119 annually, includes access to a library of more than 2 million songs and thousands of stations and playlists. Amazon Music Unlimited, which starts at $7.99 a month, offers over 50 million songs.With music being one of the primary uses for smart speakers, like the Alexa-powered Echo devices, it makes sense for Amazon to offer more ways to give Echo owners access to songs. After starting folks off on the limited library available for free, Amazon could convince some of them to transition over to a paid service, such as Prime or Music Unlimited.Alexa already works with a variety of other free and paid music services, including Spotify, Pandora and Apple Music.To use the new service, non-Prime customers can cue up a station based on a song, artist, era or genre, saying commands like, “Alexa, play ’80s music” or “Alexa, play the playlist Pop Culture.”Google on Thursday launched a similar service for its Google Home smart speakers, letting users access an ad-supported free tier of YouTube Music. Share your voice Review • Google Home is better than ever, but you probably shouldn’t buy it CNET may get a commission from retail offers. $99 How To • Make Google Home get your groceries Tags See it Alexa Amazon Voice recognition Googlelast_img read more