Vessel with 95kg cocaine nabbed in Pomeroon River

first_imgTwo men were taken into custody by ranks of the Customs Anti-Narcotic Unit (CANU) following the discovery of more than 95 kilograms of cocaine in a vessel that was intercepted along the Pomeroon River on Monday.Based on reports received, the vessel was stopped and searched by members ofThe cocaine that was intercepted in the vessel along the Pomeroon Riverthe Guyana Defence Force (GDF) Coast Guard and it was during that operation that several well wrapped packages were unearthed and upon checking, the illegal substance detected.The men and the suspected cocaine were transported to CANU’s headquarters as investigations continue. According to a release issued by the drug enforcement unit, the men are being interrogated and charges are likely to be instituted shortly.However, it is not clear if the vessel is owned by Guyanese or originated from neighbouring Venezuela, since the information provided by CANU was limited.Earlier in the year, a vessel was discovered in Guyana suspected to have been carrying cocaine but was allegedly released.However, one month after its release, President David Granger ordered that a Commission of Inquiry (CoI) be launched to determine the role played by the Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit (CANU) and the GDF Coast Guard in the detention and release of the vessel.The findings of the CoI were later handed over to Minister of State Joseph Harmon by Chairman, Brigadier (Retired) Bruce Lovell.Brigadier Lovell, in an invited comment, stated that inquiries are important particularly in matters of national interest.The report that was presented, he noted, will assist Guyana in making some important decisions in the security architecture of this country and that it will assist in making decisions, particularly as it relates to the fight against narcotics trafficking.“Inquiries do what any good journalist would do and that is to answer the Five W’s and the one H; the Who, the What, the Where, the Why and the When and it also goes a bit further and seeks to recommend what should be done to prevent any further occurrence,” he noted.He further noted that in the recommendations, the Committee looked at a number of systematic issues, doctrine, organisation, training, leadership, personnel, facilities and, of course, policies.The other members of the Commission were former Assistant Commissioner of Police, Winston Cosbert and Christine Bailey.Meanwhile, at the commencement of the CoI, Head of the Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit, James Singh was asked to proceed on annual leave and Major General Retired, Michael Artherly assumed the post at the helm of the Unit.Singh however, was subsequently relieved of his duties as the head drug enforcement body. It is believed that based on the findings during the COI, recommendations were made for him to be relived from his post.last_img read more

Green stem syndrome

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest One issue that impacts soybean harvest in the eastern Corn Belt at some level each year is green stem syndrome. Green stem syndrome could be larger issue for the 2017 harvest because of latter planting dates in many areas. When green stem syndrome occurs, stems and leaves can remain green after pods have matured. As a result, while pods and seeds are mature and dry enough to be harvested, harvest operations can be slowed as combines have more difficulty dealing with stems and leaves that are still green. In addition to creating harvest delays, green stem syndrome can increase fuel consumption and result in shattering losses if growers delay harvest until stems have fully matured.The occurrence of green stems varies from year-to-year and can be affected by several factors, such as:• Viral infections• Insect feeding• Late planting• Drought stress• Application of fungicidesSuccessful management of green stem syndrome requires management practices that include timely planting, establishing adequate plant stands, irrigation, and controlling insects/pests. By making these management practices a priority, growers can minimize the likelihood that green stem syndrome will develop in their soybean fields. Although green stem syndrome slows down harvest, soybeans should be harvested as soon as pods are fully mature in order to minimize harvest losses due to shattering.last_img read more

Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 122 | Mental Health and Farming Naked

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Dale, Matt and Kolt are with you this week. Matt needs to clear the air on his farming naked shirt and Dale recaps the latest USDA stock report.During the Farm Science Review, Matt sat down with OCJ Marketing Specialist Risë Labig to chat with Jolene Brown about farm stress and mental health. Dusty joins us with an interview with Barry McGraw of the Ohio Soybean Council, and we meet Luke Crumley, the new Director of Public Policy and Nutrient Management for the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association.last_img

Is The World Ready For Consumer Mobile Technology In Emergency Services?

first_imgRole of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Tags:#Government#mobile christina ortiz Related Posts center_img The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces If you spot your local boys in blue chatting on a smart phone don’t worry – they’re probably not just chatting with their spouses. It turns out that giving emergency services access to consumer-style mobile devices like tablets and smart phones is a shift many government agencies are making to boost cost-effectiveness and improve responsiveness. The future of emergency services is headed in a very mobile and digital direction, even the fed is starting to notice. The Department of Homeland Security asked a team of futurists from the agency’s Science and Technology Directorate to brainstorm future technological needs of emergency workers and first responders. The prognosticators came up with a ton of scenarios where existing technologies could help police, firefighters and Emergency Medical Technicians do their jobs. Most of them were super-technical, like cops using Google Glasses to scope out suspects from a distance, but the overall message was clear: Accessibility and interconnectivity is key in making emergency services work faster and more efficiently. The Mobile Future Is NowMaking these changes seems daunting and expensive, but it’s already happening in significant ways. For example, the Chatham-Kent police force in Ontario, Canada, is participating in a pilot project using a Blackberry Playbook (remember, it’s Canada)  to control squad cars. The tablet is used to record evidence and look up information at crime scenes and can connected with smartphones, PCs and on-board printers through Bluetooth. It even controls the siren and lights of the vehicle. Microsoft has displayed a similar application through its Modularis prototype that runs on Windows 8. Paramedics at the Hennepin County Medical Center in Minnesota use the SafetyPad tablet to file reports previously done on paper. The tablet serves as a one stop spot for information on current emergencies by displaying location information from 911 operators. It also keeps track of patient vitals and provides key questions for the EMTs to get the best treatment options for the situation. The hospital receives messages from the tablet to better prepare for the patient’s arrival in the Emergency Room.  All of this data is stored in a database that can be accessed at any hospital and is also used for charting medical trends and billing purposes. Mobile Helps Them Help You So how does all of this benefit the average citizen? Mostly by saving precious time. Instead of a cop having to go back to the station to look up information, she can access it on site and spend more time in communities and on the streets. (It might also make it easier and faster for the Highway Patrol to write you a ticket, sorry.)For EMTs and hospitals, saving time could mean more lives saved. Time travelled from the scene of an accident to the hospital is vital for collecting information, and there are big advantages in disseminating it that information on the fly. Wait times at the ER could potentially be shorter because the information staff needs is already available, not hanging out on a sheet of paper in a clipboard. Money Is Always An IssueCost-effectiveness is also an issue, of course, though it’s conveniently left pretty vague in reports. The DHS told the Science and Technology Directorate  think tank that it should forget about the fiscal constraints of our current economy and imagine a “a ‘blue sky’ scenario, where anything might be possible.” The study released by Blackberry about the Chatham project mentions only that the Playbook system is a “cost-effective method of putting information in the officer’s hands.”Still, relying on relatively inexpensive consumer technology should sae money, and industry after industry have already learned that going mobile means less paper, fewer expensive man-hours and overall greater efficiency.Still, with all that’s on the line, expect emergency services organizations to be cautious about embracing consumer mobile technology before it has fully proven its value and reliability. Image courtesy of Shutterstock. last_img read more

Making Do With Google’s Leftovers

first_imgCognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… It’s perhaps one of the industry’s great ironies that today’s hottest enterprise technology is yesterday’s leftovers at Google. Hadoop, an open-source implementation of Google’s MapReduce technology, is all the rage in the enterprise as a primary tool for tackling Big Data, and probably will remain such for years to come.But at Google, MapReduce may already be too slow and not nearly scalable enough.This isn’t news. Mike Miller, CEO of Cloudant, made this point in 2012, and Bill McColl, CEO of Cloudscale, made it two years before that. As McColl argued in 2010, “the people who really do have cutting edge performance and scalability requirements today have already moved on from the Hadoop model.”Which is another way of saying Google lives in the future.I’ve told the story before about a wealthy friend telling me his money lets him “see into the future a few years” by affording expensive things today that will be cheap for everyone in the future. In a similar fashion, Google, not to mention other web giants like Facebook and Twitter, is building things today, to solve problems of scale and data processing, that will likely be commonplace for mainstream enterprises tomorrow. Today Google’s data and scale problems are almost magical. Tomorrow they will likely be average.Which may mean that peering into the future, whether you’re an entrepreneur or a venture capitalist, may be as simple as watching Google. While Facebook releases much of its code as open source, the place to gaze into Google’s soul is its treasure trove of published research. There you’ll find “Efficient spatial sampling of large geographical tables” and more information on “Spanner: Google’s Globally-Distributed Database.”You will see, in other words, the future of enterprise computing, otherwise known as Google’s leftovers. Image courtesy of AHMAD FAIZAL YAHYA / Shutterstock. Matt Asay IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Related Posts center_img Tags:#enterprise IT#Facebook#future of IT#Google#Hadoop#MapReduce Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Nowlast_img read more