LCPS Graduates 17 ‘Specialized Doctors’

first_imgDr. Ross Jallah Macauley, LCPS’ past treasurer and former Health Minister, Dr. Bernice Dahn were part of Friday’s ceremonies. The Liberia College of Physicians and Surgeons (LCPS) on Friday July 19, 2019, graduated 17 ‘specialized doctors at a colorful ceremony hosted in the auditorium of the SKD Sports Complex in Paynesville City.The LCPS’ third convocation ceremony coincided with its fourth annual general and scientific meeting, which was held under the theme, “Good Governance in the Medical Profession,” with the sub-theme, “Medical Doctors as Exemplars of Good Leadership.”The LCPS is a professional institution established by law in 2012, and officially launched in 2013 to train medical specialists to provide a high level of healthcare to patients.The graduates were trained as specialists in Internal Medicine, Pediatrics (children), General Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology (women). By that, authorities at the Ministry of Health are expected to assign each of the doctors to the various health facilities across the country.The LCPS newly admitted members by examinations in the department of Internal Medicine include Drs. Cozie Gwailolo, Tabehde Freeman Murray, Kolu Beyan Davies and Varbah Paye. The two admitted into the department of Pediatrics (children) are Drs. Yuah A. Nemah and Minnie Sankawulo-Ricks; department of General Surgery are Drs. Kalamon Wullie, Jonathan M. Hart, Albertha Clarke, Joseph K. Wehyee and Wilmot Frank, while in the department of Obstetrics//Gynecology includes Drs. Deazee M. Saywon, Numenine E. Endersks, Momolu Massaley, Ansumana Camara and Kortu D. Sannor.A cross-section of the newly admitted specialized doctors.LCPS vice president for Physicians Dr. Benjamin Harris said two additional faculties, including the one for internal medicine with the collaboration of the ELWA Hospital, and the another for ophthalmology (eye) in collaboration with an eye institute in India in the last two years.“Since the inception of the College, we have so far inducted into our membership 47 individuals,” Dr. Harris told the elated audience.“Today, we are pleased to inform you that we are again certificating as specialists into our four core faculty of Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, General Surgery and Obstetrics and Gynecology,” he added.According to Dr. Harris, the current number of physicians in the country is 1, 505, “far below the recommended ratio of 1 physician per 1000 population set by WHO.”“Only about eight percent of doctors practicing in the country have had formal training; there existed no specialty training. Those who sought further training did so in foreign countries and most did not return, but in 2012, prior to the establishment of the LCPS, there were only 144 Liberian doctors practicing in the country, and only 15 had received specialist training,” recalls Dr. Harris.He said the need for postgraduate training could not therefore be overemphasized.The Minister of Health, Dr. Wilhelmina S. Jallah, appealed to the newly inducted ‘specialized doctors’ to accept and embrace whatever areas of their assignments from the ministry would be. Minister Jallah’s called to the doctors comes in the midst of challenges confronting the country’s health sector.“We know there are challenges, there will be sometimes the lack of water supply; there will be lack of electricity and sometimes in adequate housing facilities. And I know that the money you will be paid might not be the money you are expecting as a specialized doctor, but please, accept the those conditions so that we move the country forward,” Dr. Jallah told the graduates.She said the ministry is charged with the responsibility of placing these specialists at the various facilities across the country where they will be starting their medical career.Madam Mawine D. Diggs, Deputy Foreign Affairs Minister for Administration, encouraged the graduates to focus on trust and excellence.Madam Diggs emphasized the need to prioritize good governance across all sectors of the country using the best international business model.“In almost every sector of the society, whether health, education or any non-governmental institution, there is a need to approach governance to the business model that assumes accountability, respect and responsibility,” She said.Madam Diggs continued, “If we cannot be accountable for our actions; if we cannot demonstrate respect for our peers, and those we choose and decided to serve; and if we cannot show that we are prepared, all the dividends we have accrued will not benefit our society.”She praised the graduates for the time and efforts in the medical school, but cautioned them to be mindful of the greater praises they would receive from their patients, noting that being a ‘specialized doctor’ comes with some responsibilities, as such they must show respect and be accountable to society.Dr. John Nkrumah Mills, president of the Ghanaian College of Physicians and Surgeons (GCPS), who honored the LCPS’s invitation to attend the 4th Annual General and Scientific Meeting and 3rd Convocation ceremony, urged the leadership of the LCPS to continue the efforts in training more specialized doctors to help the society.To the graduates, Dr. Mills added, “To whom much is given, much is expected, therefore, colleagues of the graduates and the society expect more of them, and that they must remain committed to medical profession and their responsibility to save lives.He then expressed the hope that their addition in the health sector as young, but well trained and specialized doctors will bring improvement in the Liberian health sector.According to Dr. Mills, since the GCPS was established, 45 physicians have received specialist training, and have been awarded membership into the four core faculties of Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, General Surgeons and Obstetrics and Gynecology in Ghana. “They are so well, like you too will do so well in your respective areas of assignments, he told to the graduates to the delight of their parents and well-wishers who graced the occasion in their numbers.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Business confidence continues to improve

first_img8 September 2010The South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Sacci) Business Confidence Index for August, released this week, shows a jump by 3.3 points to 87.6 from 84.3 in July – the highest level so far this year.The level of the Business Confidence Index (BCI) for August is 4.6 points above the level for the same month in 2009, the chamber said in a statement this week.In comparing August 2010 with July 2010 (month-on-month) and with August 2009 (year-on-year), nine of the sub-indices of the BCI improved on both counts. Between July 2010 and August 2010, two sub-indices were negative and two were neutral.The sub-index on the volume of merchandise imports again recorded a relatively strong performance compared to previous months.“It can be expected that the spike in the SACCI Business Confidence Index during August 2010 will be followed by a correction, as unusual positive developments on the trade account and net financial inflows from the rest of the world created the positive shift,” the chamber said.“However, the BCI will probably continue its generally positive trend in the medium term smoothing out the short-term volatility.”Public servants’ strikeEarly signals are that the third quarter will continue in the same vein as the second quarter as South Africa continues to be plagued by strikes.These labour disputes have unknown dimensions for policy and crippling implications, says the chamber, for instance where there are still public service delivery backlogs.“The outcome of the public servants’ strike will have serious consequences for already tight fiscal circumstances as well as unintended consequences for employment prospects.”Interest rate cutsThe chamber argues that there is a case for lowering interest rates, “thereby alleviating some of the financial pressures associated with servicing debt and potentially stimulating an improvement in current levels of economic activity”.Credit extension to the business sector declined by 0.7% year-on-year in nominal terms in July 2010.“SACCI however acknowledges that interest rate reductions are not a panacea for sustainable economic growth.“Such growth must be underpinned by economic discipline with regard to expenditure and labour remuneration, and a higher rate of fixed investment, which would promote business confidence.”SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

US aviation firm eyes SA for growth

first_img29 April 2011As part of its growing focus on the African market, US aviation company Hawker Beechcraft Corporation (HBC) has appointed Johannesburg-based Absolute Aviation as an exclusive Beechcraft distributor for sub-Saharan Africa.HBC has also identified the South African commercial environment as offering some of the best growth prospects of any country in the world.“Africa represents a huge opportunity for us as travel around the continent is becoming increasingly important,” HBC president for Europe, Middle East and Africa Sean McGeough said in a statement this week.Based at Lanseria International Airport north of Johannesburg, Absolute Aviation offers aviation consulting services to companies or individuals wishing to acquire and operate an aircraft, or for existing aircraft owners who require a turnkey operational management service.“We have already seen strong interest in our aircraft from a number of organisations, including multi-nationals based there,” he said. “The addition of Absolute Aviation to our network provides further impetus to strong Beechcraft sales in the region.”Demand for business aircraft to growHBC’s King Air models are particularly popular in Africa as a result of their durability, reliability, fuel-efficiency and the ability to operate almost anywhere, making it an ideal choice of transportation for corporate executives travelling throughout Africa.“As the country and the continent develop, demand for business aircraft will grow dramatically to provide access to remote parts of the region, cover vast distances and also help counter the limitations of the transportation infrastructure, which is under-developed compared to other parts of the world,” McGeough said.“Travelling by business aircraft is therefore not only often the quickest way to travel, but sometimes the only option.”SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more